2001 never got anything

Discussion in 'Coin Chat' started by Italy8686, Feb 26, 2021.

  1. Italy8686

    Italy8686 Italy8686

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  3. Italy8686

    Italy8686 Italy8686

    Thoa was the last one I never got anything on it had to repost separately
     
    SensibleSal66 likes this.
  4. Italy8686

    Italy8686 Italy8686

  5. Italy8686

    Italy8686 Italy8686

    Die break
     
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  6. SensibleSal66

    SensibleSal66 Casual Collector / error expert "in Training "

    Is it a raised or sunken in ?
     
  7. Italy8686

    Italy8686 Italy8686

  8. Italy8686

    Italy8686 Italy8686

    And straight line
     
  9. Italy8686

    Italy8686 Italy8686

    This is the best I can do 20210225_205439~3.jpg
     
    SensibleSal66 likes this.
  10. SensibleSal66

    SensibleSal66 Casual Collector / error expert "in Training "

    The only thing I can think of is a Die Crack or Linear plating issue like this 1986 Penny .
    55042155.jpg
     
  11. Italy8686

    Italy8686 Italy8686

    There is more there then just the die crack strong lettering both sides 20210225_205439~6.jpg
     
  12. Italy8686

    Italy8686 Italy8686

  13. Italy8686

    Italy8686 Italy8686

  14. Italy8686

    Italy8686 Italy8686

  15. Italy8686

    Italy8686 Italy8686

    Now is it just me or does that look like the torch on a dime
     
  16. Italy8686

    Italy8686 Italy8686

    I can even see the bands
     
  17. Oldhoopster

    Oldhoopster Member of the ANA since 1982

    Linear plating blisters and stains. Nothing else. Plating blisters/bubbles are common on zincolns

    You're imagination is starting to get ahead of you. By now, you should have a basic knowledge of the minting and die making process if you studied the links members have been posting for you. Think this through. How could your coin be struck over a dime and still be on a cent planchet. Easy answer = It Can't. A cent planchet is too big to fit into the striking chamber for dimes.

    The odds of finding an extremely rare error in change is probably higher than winning the lottery. No amount of wishing and hoping is going to change reality. There are only a limited number of ways a mint error can occur, but countless ways for a coin to get damaged after it leaves the mint. That's why you need to keep studying the minting process. Instead of thinking "I see a torch and bands", you need to be thinking "how could the torch from a dime get on a cent planchet, then be overstruck as a cent".

    To paraphrase the 14th Century Franciscan Friar and philosopher, William of Ockham, the simplest explanation is usually the correct explanation.
     
    Inspector43 likes this.
  18. Inspector43

    Inspector43 73 Year Collector Supporter

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  19. Razz

    Razz Critical Thinker

    +1
     
  20. robec

    robec Junior Member

    Your 2001 is like this coin only less so. As said in the above posts this is quite common in Lincolns minted after 1982.

    GiJoe_1988dMS68RD_o7r4.jpg
     
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