1991 D lincoln cent Master hub coin

Discussion in 'Error Coins' started by Jewels2017, Aug 12, 2017.

  1. Jewels2017

    Jewels2017 Active Member

    Well first of all I'm no expert on Master hubs ... But I was told by someone recently that this coin could possibly be a Master hub cent . And so I was wondering if anyone on here could possibly please tell me whether or not there are any websites or any other specific factors on a Master hub coins that can probably tell me if this coin has the same characteristics ? If so I would greatly appreciate it because I have never seen a coin that has the same Master hub quality as this one ...
    IMG_20170808_193723.jpg IMG_20170806_233317.jpg
     
    Tyler Graton likes this.
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  3. cpm9ball

    cpm9ball Cannot Re-Member

    @Jewels2017
    I'm not sure who gave you that information. Perhaps you misunderstood. The master hub is used to create a master die which is then used to create a working hub which is then used to create the working dies which are then used to produce the coins. Technically speaking, all coins come from a master hub but they are more like the great-great-grandchildren.

    Chris
     
  4. Jewels2017

    Jewels2017 Active Member

    Oh ok ... Great . Then if I'm understanding you correctly then how do you tell when you have a coin that was created to be used as the master hub . Or how can a person tell if he found a great great great grandfather coin . Lol
     
  5. cpm9ball

    cpm9ball Cannot Re-Member

    The master hub is never used to produce a coin.

    The master die is never used to produce a coin.

    The working hub is never used to produce a coin.

    Only the working die is used to produce coins.

    I was being facetious when referencing the lineage: coin (offspring), working die (parent), working hub (grandparent), master die (great-grandparent), master hub (great-great-grandparent).

    Chris
     
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  6. Jewels2017

    Jewels2017 Active Member

    Ok great . Now can you please speak in simple terms for me because as I clearly stated in the very beginning I am no expert on the Master hub subject as that is not my area of expertise . Now .... All I need to know is how can I tell if I have the original coin that was the very first coin ever produced ?
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2017
  7. ldhair

    ldhair Clean Supporter

    It's not possible to know the very first coin. There will be many working dies used each year and many coins made from each of those working dies.
     
  8. Tyler Graton

    Tyler Graton Well-Known Member

    I think what you are talking about jewels is proof coins. Proof coin with first strike/near first strike have a deep frost cameo. You know how some proof coins are frosty and some are not. Well I think, I could be wrong but the way I understand it is if it's got the frosting it's an early die state, and as coins are struck it begins to lose the deep frost cameo and begins to look really shiney?
     
  9. Cheech9712

    Cheech9712 Active Member

    I think your asking a question that can't be answered with any certainty
     
  10. Jewels2017

    Jewels2017 Active Member

    Well thanks for the input Tyler G. ... I get what you're saying and that makes perfect sense . But the problem I'm having is that the coin I've posted doesn't have that type of shine to it and yet at the same time it still has this strange feel like it's a Special made coin for some strange reason . In other words If you look at it very closely . You can actually see how all the words date ect. Is perfectly spaced away from the rim of the coin unlike some coins where the letter L in liberty is practically TOUCHING the rim . And then every word is clean , neat and crsip despite the obvious wear and dirty condition of the coin .... And last but not least . The coins rim has this extra wide and flat perfect rim unlike no other coins . And it all just has this bold feel to it and I can't quite put my finger on it
     
  11. Jewels2017

    Jewels2017 Active Member

    Oh and thanks Idhair and Cheech9712 .
     
  12. jay4202472000

    jay4202472000 Well-Known Member

    I don't see any die flow lines that just jump out. It looks like it is a well struck, earlier die state coin. Looks like it would have been really nice when it was BU.
     
  13. Tyler Graton

    Tyler Graton Well-Known Member

    IMG_2208.PNG Looks kinda like a proof coin but Denver didn't make proof coins.... weird.
     
  14. Tyler Graton

    Tyler Graton Well-Known Member

    IMG_2209.JPG Hm. This is what i feel what it should look like
     
  15. Tyler Graton

    Tyler Graton Well-Known Member

    Yeah jewels your coin is a brilliant uncirculated coin that somehow got into circulation I think. Look up brilliant uncirculated 1991 D penny. They cost 1.00
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2017
  16. ldhair

    ldhair Clean Supporter

    What? All coins enter circulation as BU.
     
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  17. jay4202472000

    jay4202472000 Well-Known Member

    That image represents a coin in a later die state. Notice the die flow lines especially above IGWT.
     
  18. jay4202472000

    jay4202472000 Well-Known Member

    As Idhair stated, all business strike coins are brilliant uncirculated when they leave the mint...unless they were damaged somehow. So it was supposed to get into circulation.
     
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  19. Jewels2017

    Jewels2017 Active Member

    Well everyone definitely has some great points but I'm starting to think that Tyler Graton may be on to something .... Because if you really think about it looks like a Proof strike missing the polished treated die and since he says that Denver never made any Proof coins could it be that it somehow got accidentally feed into the wrong press at the Denver mint .... Is that even possible ?
     
    Tyler Graton likes this.
  20. BooksB4Coins

    BooksB4Coins Newbieus Sempiterna

    Occam's razor, sir. If you would only take the time to familiarize yourself with the basics instead of chasing rainbows, you'll be the better for it.
     
  21. Tyler Graton

    Tyler Graton Well-Known Member

    I think you should listen to the old folk. I am wrong lol. I just think it looks proof cause I never really mess with proof coin. Only proof I'll probably even get is from circulation lol
     
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