1973 D Penny weighs 3.48 grams

Discussion in 'Error Coins' started by Ginny Hylton, Jun 15, 2019.

  1. Ginny Hylton

    Ginny Hylton New Member

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  3. paddyman98

    paddyman98 Let me burst your bubble! Supporter

    It is heavier but within tolerance.
     
  4. Ginny Hylton

    Ginny Hylton New Member

    Sorry, new here. This is my first post and I did it wrong. I have a 1973 D penny that weighs 3.48 grams? Any help on it would be greatly appreciated.
    Ginny
     
  5. Ginny Hylton

    Ginny Hylton New Member

    Thank you for your help.
     
  6. Pete Apple

    Pete Apple Well-Known Member

    I would be interested to know the thickness of the coin in mm to 2 decimals. The coin is just slightly heavy. Expected weight/tolerance:

    Weights and Tolerances for Lincoln Cents:

    Copper Cent = 3.110g +/- 0.130g

    Steel cent = 2.689g/2.754g +/- 0.130g (Heavier weight produced in late 1943)

    Zinc Cent = 2.500g +/- 0.100g
     
  7. Michael K

    Michael K Well-Known Member

    Yes the copper range is 2.98g-3.24g so it is above tolerance.
    Take several weighings, try the center of the scale. Weigh other cents (They should be 3.1 and 2.5 for copper and zinc) as a control to see if the scale is calibrated correctly. Now while it is heavy, it's only a little out of range. It could be a thicker
    rolled planchet. Which is an error. The heavier and thicker the better. There won't be much premium on this one, but I would keep it and label the weight on a 2x2 coin flip.
     
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  8. desertgem

    desertgem MODERATOR Senior Errer Collecktor Moderator

    If you do not have a calibration weight, use a Splenda or other sweetener packet as they usually come in 1 gram packet, to check the scale's accuracy. Jim
     
    352sdeer and Oldhoopster like this.
  9. Jason h

    Jason h New Member

    He is right I have a 1957 d penny that weighs 3.48 I dont understand it either.
     
  10. Jason h

    Jason h New Member

    If anyone knows anything about a 1957 d penny weighing 3.48 let me know. It seems like it has errors. I'm not a coin collector and when I seen this penny I thought it could be worth something. It definitely has the ridges lifted like it got printed wrong.
     
  11. paddyman98

    paddyman98 Let me burst your bubble! Supporter

    There are planchets that when created were cut from a thicker than normal sheet of copper. It is a well known issue. But that heavier weight is nothing major.

    sounds like damage.

    Also.. Coins are struck/minted not printed. Ink is used to print paper currency.
     
  12. paddyman98

    paddyman98 Let me burst your bubble! Supporter

    No premium for it.
     
  13. Pete Apple

    Pete Apple Well-Known Member

    I would be interested in knowing the thickness. Expected = 1.52 mm - 0.102mm/+0.152mm
     
  14. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    It's within tolerance so nothing special. Welcome to CT.
     
  15. Pete Apple

    Pete Apple Well-Known Member

    The weight of the coin is 0.24g above weight tolerance (not much but outside of tolerance). I am interested to learn whether or not the coin is within thickness tolerance.
     
  16. 352sdeer

    352sdeer Collecting Lincoln cents for 50 years!

    @Ginny Hylton Old Abe needs to go on a diet looks like he had to many deserts while dining at the White House lol.
    Good eye how did you come to notice it was different? We’re you weighing coins at random or what?

    Reed
     
  17. Michael K

    Michael K Well-Known Member

    Yes the tolerance is +/- .13 2.98-3.24.
    Pete Apple has said it is .24 above tolerance which is enough for a small premium.
    Assuming the scale is correct, Paddy is probably right about it being a thicker rolled planchet. It is worth saving. You won't get rich but it's worth more than normal 3 cent wheat value.
     
  18. desertgem

    desertgem MODERATOR Senior Errer Collecktor Moderator

    When one is basing an error or variety on weight, be sure to carefully calibrate the balance before weighing. I know many that do not do that except maybe when they first got it. Most balances come with a accurate weight for calibration. Moving the balance or going over max weight can disrupt the previous calibration. Jim
     
  19. Heavymetal

    Heavymetal Well-Known Member

    Best way to check a scale is with nickels. They are extremely accurate on 5 grams. Try 5 or 10 to see
     
  20. Conder101

    Conder101 Numismatist

    But even they have a tolerance of +/- .19 grams.

    Desertgem probably has a better suggestion with the sweetner packets, but is that 1 gram weight with or without the paper packet?

    If I remember correctly dollar bills are also very close to 1 gram. Just weighed three different notes each weighed 1.00 grams.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2019
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