1971 D Quarter on dime stock

Discussion in 'Error Coins' started by eric6794, Aug 13, 2017.

  1. eric6794

    eric6794 Well-Known Member

    Hey all I just wanted to share my latest find. I received this at work tonight and only noticed it because of the similar to silver ping it gave. One of my neater finds in the wild. Correct me if im wrong but this would be considered a off metal error correct? the third pic is of a dime and the quarter side by side the quarter is on top. 1971ddimestock1.jpg 1971ddimestock2.jpg 1971ddimestock3.jpg 1971ddimestock4.jpg
     
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  3. Beefer518

    Beefer518 Well-Known Member

    A clad dime weighs 2.27 grams, so you're way over-weight for a dime planchet.
    A clad quarter should weigh 5.670 grams, so you're underweight there. Hmm.

    A quarter, if struck on a dime planchet, would not have the full design and rim, like yours. It would never physically fit on a dime with full image.

    If I had to guess, it's some type of planchet error, but I haven't a clue what kind. Possibly struck on a foreign planchet?

    Do you have a digital caliper to measure the diameter and thickness? That could help possibly narrow down what planchet it is on.

    I would hold on to it, and possibly submit it for attribution.
     
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  4. Tyler Graton

    Tyler Graton Well-Known Member

    @paddyman98 would know. He collects these errors. He called his struck on a rolled thin planchet
     
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  5. eric6794

    eric6794 Well-Known Member

    A quarter struck on dime stock is when the sheet of clad metal that was intended to have dimes struck but instead when the mint cut out the blanks they accidentally cut quarter blanks instead so therefore they have the same diameter but the coin is as thin as a dime thats why they weigh more than a dime but less than a quarter. I wish it was something like struck on foreign planchet cause it would be far more valuable :greedy:
     
  6. eric6794

    eric6794 Well-Known Member

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  7. Tyler Graton

    Tyler Graton Well-Known Member

    @eric6794 i would wait for paddyman98 I could be wrong but it sure looks like rolled thin.
     
  8. Beefer518

    Beefer518 Well-Known Member

    This is why I shouldn't be posting at 3am. I totally misread/misinterpretted your title, and then my brain didn't register what you were saying in the post.

    Funny thing is, I was trying to think of the word for the un-punched sheet of metal. That would be... stock. :banghead:
     
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  9. Tyler Graton

    Tyler Graton Well-Known Member

    Is it just me or does unum on the reverse look like it spells un ch
     
  10. eric6794

    eric6794 Well-Known Member

    its rolled thin because these blanks were cut from the stock intended for dimes which is thinner than quarters. The mint accidentally sent the clad roll to the quarter blank planchet punch then sent the coins to be milled then the quarter die stamped it. The relief is weak because of the thinner composition so it couldnt get a strong enough strike to have good details. It's late so my brain is in sleep shut down but I think thats how you explain it.
     
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  11. Oldhoopster

    Oldhoopster It seemed like a good idea at the time.

    It looks like it has potential to be a quarter struck on thinner stock, since it's light weight. Could be Dime stock or just a manufacturing error rolling the strip thinner than the quarter specs. Also, I can't see anything obvious indicating abrasion or other sources of metal removal, so you may have something.

    You should be able to calculate what a quarter struck on dime stock should weigh, but I'm too lazy on a Sunday morning to do it. (or as an old professor of mine used to joke when he got stuck on a derivation in class; "We will leave that as an exercise for the student to complete") :)
     
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  12. mikediamond

    mikediamond Coin Collector

    The weight is spot-on for a quarter struck on dime stock. This is a rare date for such an error, so hold onto it.
     
  13. lordmarcovan

    lordmarcovan Eclectic & Odd Supporter

    Intriguing find.
     
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  14. Michael K

    Michael K Well-Known Member

    This could be a very good error. The weight and thickness suggest it is good.
     
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  15. Beefer518

    Beefer518 Well-Known Member

    Wouldn't it also stand to reason that there are more of these out there?
     
  16. eric6794

    eric6794 Well-Known Member

    Thanks Mike. So with it being a harder date for this type of error would it be worth slabbing? Generally speaking these bring 20-100 dollars.
     
  17. Michael K

    Michael K Well-Known Member

  18. eric6794

    eric6794 Well-Known Member

    They are unusual to find floating about but kind of common. Check eBay past sales there are several listed.
     
  19. paddyman98

    paddyman98 Doubled Die.. Not Double! Supporter

    @eric6794
    The date, 1971 is a big clue. These occurred around this time - Struck on 10C Thickness Stock, not rolled thin planchet ;)
    Here are examples from my collection -
    3657400-001.JPG 2634215-002.JPG
     
  20. Tyler Graton

    Tyler Graton Well-Known Member

    Grand masta paddyman98 to the rescue hahahaaaa. I knew he would know.
     
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  21. eric6794

    eric6794 Well-Known Member

    is there a error you dont have in your collection yet :D
     
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