1969-s penny 2.9grams

Discussion in 'Error Coins' started by MArkus B, May 19, 2019.

  1. MArkus B

    MArkus B New Member

    I recently discovered a 1969-s penny that looks off colored which brought it to my attention. It felt lighter than a copper penny. So I weighed it and it has an exact weight of 2.9 Grams. Not sure what it is made of. But am wondering if I got something special here. Let me know anybody out there listening. Much appreciated.
     
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  3. paddyman98

    paddyman98 No Common Cents! Supporter

    Could be acid dipped, environmental damage, struck on thinner than normal planchet or altered..

    Pictures are needed to determine what you have!
     
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  4. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

  5. Michael K

    Michael K Well-Known Member

    With a +/- .13g weight tolerance, that makes the range 2.98-3.24g. While 2.90 would be a little light (if your scale is precise to the hundredths) if the coin is otherwise normal it is not light enough to be of any extra value.
     
  6. MArkus B

    MArkus B New Member

    Here a pic of it
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

  8. Fred Weinberg

    Fred Weinberg Well-Known Member

    Official tolerance would be 2.97 grams on the low side,
    so your coin is very close.

    As C.N. said above, the surfaces look funky, so whatever
    caused it might have taken of a touch of weight.

    It's not an error coin, and the 2.9 grams is close enough to
    the low tolerance that it is meaningless.
     
  9. MArkus B

    MArkus B New Member

    there is no FG on the Reverse either
     
  10. paddyman98

    paddyman98 No Common Cents! Supporter

    Post a picture.. Could be a Floating Roof Cent. Always post full clear pictures of both sides when creating a thread.
     
  11. MArkus B

    MArkus B New Member

    Pic of reverse
    No FG
    Floating roof?
     

    Attached Files:

  12. Conder101

    Conder101 Numismatist

    Especially since if it is only weighed to one decimal place it could actually weigh as much as 2.94 grams, just .03 grams out of tolerance.
     
  13. Michael K

    Michael K Well-Known Member

    While it does look like a floating roof, the condition is an issue.
     
  14. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    Agreeded.
     
  15. MArkus B

    MArkus B New Member

    Thx for the info. Another subject. I have an 1943-D steel penny in great condition except for the fact the It has a milky white residue on it all over the reverse and obverse. Is there a way to remove that without damaging the coin or making it so that a 3rd party grading site doesn’t recognize that it was removed. Or should it be left on.
    Thanks guys.
     

    Attached Files:

  16. desertgem

    desertgem MODERATOR Senior Errer Collecktor Moderator

    The important thing about the 1943 zinc plated steel cents is that they were punched out of a roll of zinc plated steel , so each one only had the zinc on the obverse and reverse, NOT the EDGE, so if it has zinc or zinc oxide rather than steel ( perhaps rusty) color. it has been reprocessed ( re plated) and is graded as damaged.
     
  17. Michael K

    Michael K Well-Known Member

    Markus grading is expensive and even if your 1943 was MS (it's not) it still
    wouldn't be worth getting graded.
    Very often these coins were "reprocessed" and that takes the value down to a few pennies. So they may look shiny and new, but they are damaged post mint from replating. Yours has a different appearance, but the surfaces do not appear original.
     
  18. MArkus B

    MArkus B New Member

    Thx for the info Michael. Ya it’s hard to know which coins to really send off for grading sometimes. I look at the pictures on PCGS and compare and contrast, but is is only two dimensional viewing. It’s hard to tell the true luster of a coin By a still picture. And I know these graders at pGCS are really tough and have cracked down hard in recent years so the market doesn’t get over saturated to drive down the price of these Coins. It makes it hard to send them off even when I think a have a beautiful specimen, nearly flawless.
    Anyone thoughts or opinions regarding this ??

    Thanks guys.
     
  19. Michael K

    Michael K Well-Known Member

    A coin should be worth a decent amount of money ($150-$200),
    or require authentication, (to determine if it is actually gold, or if some rare variety or error is real) to be worth grading.
    Most coins in my opinion don't really need to be graded.
    The ones that do, this gives some protection from future circulation, and a paper trail of documentation which will help in the future.
     
  20. desertgem

    desertgem MODERATOR Senior Errer Collecktor Moderator


    Go to every store and coin club meeting where there may be a few graded coins you can view. and especially to shows where there will be hundreds to see. If possible hide the grade until you can see bother sides.........IT takes a Heck of looking before you really get a hang of it. Like a person only weighs a 120 lbs and wants to be 240 lb muscle man, it takes a lot of time and effort! Jim
     
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