1964 D Quarter Transitional Error?

Discussion in 'Error Coins' started by Barbi Petersen, Sep 19, 2021.

  1. Barbi Petersen

    Barbi Petersen Active Member

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  3. potty dollar 1878

    potty dollar 1878 Well-Known Member

    Looks normal to me what do you mean by (transitional error?).
     
  4. Evan Saltis

    Evan Saltis College Dorm Collector Supporter

    That would be a wrong planchet in this case, clad vs silver, silver vs clad.
     
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  5. manny9655

    manny9655 Well-Known Member

    Some 64's were made from the clad die reverses meant for the 65's. Not all the quarters dated 1964 were minted in 1964, some were minted in 1965 and the wrong (clad) reverse was used. I don't recall the differences but someone here will.
     
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  6. Evan Saltis

    Evan Saltis College Dorm Collector Supporter

    it looks very much silver to me.
    Does it way 6.25 grams? Or the normal 5.76 for clad?

    Thats the right way to check, although I'm sure this is not a transitional error.
     
    JPD3, Oldhoopster and Matthew Kruse like this.
  7. potty dollar 1878

    potty dollar 1878 Well-Known Member

    Ok now I remember it just didn't sound familiar at first.
     
  8. Evan Saltis

    Evan Saltis College Dorm Collector Supporter

    Yes, this too.
     
  9. Barbi Petersen

    Barbi Petersen Active Member

  10. Evan Saltis

    Evan Saltis College Dorm Collector Supporter

    There you go ;)
    it's silver!
     
  11. Evan Saltis

    Evan Saltis College Dorm Collector Supporter

  12. Barbi Petersen

    Barbi Petersen Active Member

    That is the website I went to, and it looks like the 1st one to me, however I am the gal that can see different designs...on a lot of different coins...lol!
     
  13. Pickin and Grinin

    Pickin and Grinin Well-Known Member

  14. SensibleSal66

    SensibleSal66 Casual Collector / error Specialist "in Training "

  15. Hommer

    Hommer Curator of Semi Precious Coinage

    Transitional reverse would be Type C. Type B coins have the reverse of the proof coins and were used in many different years.
     
    Pickin and Grinin likes this.
  16. Barbi Petersen

    Barbi Petersen Active Member

    Oh boy, as in her she goes again Sal or she might have a small find?? Lol, specifics please :nailbiting:, pins and needles!
     
  17. Pickin and Grinin

    Pickin and Grinin Well-Known Member

  18. Barbi Petersen

    Barbi Petersen Active Member

    Yes that it does! Thanks.
     
  19. manny9655

    manny9655 Well-Known Member

    You didn't understand. Some 64's were struck with the clad reverse DIES. They are silver but struck with the wrong die.
     
  20. Evan Saltis

    Evan Saltis College Dorm Collector Supporter

    Yes, I took it the wrong way on this one.

    I know about the die differences, just to me I think of the 44 steel cent when I hear transitional error.

    http://lincolncentsonline.com/transitionalErrors.html

    we need a new word
     
  21. Hommer

    Hommer Curator of Semi Precious Coinage

    The easiest way to tell which reverse that your coin has is to compare the reverse of your coin to a known example.

    For the type B reverse, compare it to the details of a proof coin of the same year or era.

    For the Type C reverse, which is much easier for me to tell, just use the actual reverse of a 65 or later quarter to compare your quarter to. You will immediately notice the difference in the eagle's tail feathers and especially the definition of the leaves on the olive branch.

    Edit to add: the '64 D is the only Washington quarter to be found or known with the reverse of the next year. With literally millions of P mint coins minted at the same time, collectors have tried for decades, me included, to find a P mint coin with a Type C reverse. I have 5 D mint coins with the Type C that I've cherry picked through the years.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2021
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