1964 D 5c orange peel appearance

Discussion in 'Error Coins' started by Bargainbidder, Sep 24, 2021.

  1. Bargainbidder

    Bargainbidder Active Member

    Howdy, I was wondering what caused the orange peel look on this 1964 D? If there is a technical term or does it fall under alloy mix? Thanks 20210924_121954.jpg 20210924_122032.jpg Image_2021-09-24 12_06_07_908.JPG Image_2021-09-24 12_08_22_510.JPG Image_2021-09-24 12_06_51_433.JPG Image_2021-09-24 12_06_31_356.JPG Image_2021-09-24 12_07_37_766.JPG Image_2021-09-24 12_07_59_798.JPG
     
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  3. Evan Saltis

    Evan Saltis College Dorm Collector Supporter

    Hello,
    The orange peel look is a characteristic of die deterioration
     
  4. alurid

    alurid Well-Known Member

  5. Bargainbidder

    Bargainbidder Active Member

    Thanks for the information. So I can classify this as the reference site indicates?
     
  6. Insider

    Insider Talent on loan from...

    I never heard the term "orange peel" applied to any coin except Proof gold and it does not look like this. However, as written above this coin was made with worn dies and some of its surface looks just as the small pits on an orange's skin.

    So, my apologies to the authors of ErrorRef; but the term was around before they were born. Perhaps they can come up with a term to use from now on for the surface found ON SOME Proof gold pieces.

    The only thing that matters is that when a "numismatic term" is used, EVERYONE (both young and old) knows exactly what it refers to.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2021
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  7. physics-fan3.14

    physics-fan3.14 You got any more of them.... prooflikes? Supporter

    Sorry to be contrarian, @Insider, but I've definitely heard the term used both ways. I realize that the "orange peel" effect on proof gold is *completely* different than the effect seen here, but it is fairly common to call this effect "orange peel." In fact, it is far more commonly used for die deterioration, since proof gold is a really niche area.

    I forget where I first learned it, but I've used it to refer to the surface seen on this nickel for many, many years.
     
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  8. Insider

    Insider Talent on loan from...

    physics-fan3.14, posted: "Sorry to be contrarian, but I've definitely heard the term used both ways. I realize that the "orange peel" effect on proof gold is *completely* different than the effect seen here, but it is fairly common to call this effect "orange peel." In fact, it is far more commonly used for die deterioration, since proof gold is a really niche area.

    I forget where I first learned it, but I've used it to refer to the surface seen on this nickel for many, many years."

    Of course you've heard it! :D You were not collecting in the 1960s. Remember this:

    Things change. Examples: Mint State means nothing specific now. "Cuds" and "DOUBLE dies" are no more. Over the years, as YN's become knowledgeable and get older and "expert" in their field, what they publish often replaces the status quo before their time. Them what write the books rule. At one time in the 70s & 80s, I was in that place.

    Thus, if ErrorRef wants to call worn dies "orange peel" so be it. Unfortunately, most worn dies LOOK NOTHING LIKE THE SURFACE of an orange! ;)
     
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