1963 D 1c ddo?

Discussion in 'Error Coins' started by Bargainbidder, Jan 21, 2021.

  1. Bargainbidder

    Bargainbidder Active Member

    Morning
    Does this match any of the varieties listed in Wexler's. Although there are a multitude listed, pics are unavailable to compare and match markers to.
    Thanks again
     

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  3. SensibleSal66

    SensibleSal66 Casual Collector / error expert "in Training "

  4. Bargainbidder

    Bargainbidder Active Member

    Thanks SensibleSal66 will check it out. I also wanted to ask about markers that describe die goruge or scratches from rim. Will circulation wear ever make it impossible to find?
     
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  5. SensibleSal66

    SensibleSal66 Casual Collector / error expert "in Training "

    I can't honestly answer that but your coin looks to be in Very fine condition . Shouldn't be too hard . JMHO .
     
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  6. Bargainbidder

    Bargainbidder Active Member

    Sorry about pic. This is rim of left side as you look at coin while the right side is normal...lol
     

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  7. 1865King

    1865King Well-Known Member

    I can't see anything that would indicate the coin being a DDO but, that's just me. I looked at what SensibleSal66 posted and I could see the doubling. My problem with with coins with either a DDO or DDR is that if I need a microscope to see the doubling I wouldn't be interested in it. When you look at the 55 DDO Lincoln or the 72 DDO Lincoln it's easy to see and you only need 5X loop to examine it. Same goes for the 1916 nickel. I do own a number of DD coins but, none require more than 5X or 10X loop to see it.
     
  8. Bargainbidder

    Bargainbidder Active Member

    Got it and thanks for tip about magnification. It will help me alot as to the amount of going through the board I put aside for the last 40+ years. I didn't inspect them other than with naked time due to work and family life and it piled up like garage does over the years with juke....lol
     
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  9. 1865King

    1865King Well-Known Member

    Here some information on coin varieties & errors. What I'm about to write may not make some people happy but, it's something to think about. To start with the 1937-D buffalo nickel 3 legs. This coin is not an error or variety, it's simply an over polished die, nothing more. This coin was hyped up when someone noticed it. I've seen a number of other coins that were over polished and lost details but because they weren't hyped no one cares. What would be interesting is to find a nickel that was struck with the same dies before it was polished. The same can be said for the 1807 large cent comet variety. It's interesting but, again a damaged die. BTW I have an early die state 1807 large cent before the comet showed up. Same dies no comet (break). The same can be said about the 1920 no D Lincoln cent. I'm not saying their not interesting but, the only error was putting them back in service. I wouldn't classify an overdate as damage. They aren't errors either. In most cases that was done to keep a good die in service or cover up a minor die sinker error. Dies were hard to make in the 17 and 1800's so tossing a still usable die is expensive. This is why we see a lot of coins from 17 and 1800's with major die cracks. All of these coins can be interesting and some can demand more money to purchase them but, try to keep in mind what your actually buying.
     
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  10. Razz

    Razz Critical Thinker

    Talk about worn and over polishes dies, check out the reverse on this LWC. Those are die polish lines and maybe die scratches, but not PMD! Polish_20210121_202221013.jpg
     
  11. eddiespin

    eddiespin Fast Eddie

    That's right. They're slightly raised. Killer red cent.
     
  12. Bargainbidder

    Bargainbidder Active Member

    Wow...nice coin and thanks for the information everyone.
     
  13. 1865King

    1865King Well-Known Member

    This Lincoln cent is exactly what was talking about. I wonder how many are out there and no body cared to mention it. Same thing done as the 1920 Lincoln no D but, no body cares. Why? Because it wasn't hyped by some dealer when it was first found. I wouldn't be surprised if back in 1920 the Lincoln cent with no D when it was first notice most people or collectors wouldn't have given it a second look. Add a little hype and boom now you have a must have "variety". Think about it?
     
  14. Pickin and Grinin

    Pickin and Grinin Well-Known Member

    So, the die polish lines are a die stage what has happened is the variety had already happened. The variety was most likely a die clash. So finding the coin that has the full unabraded clash would be the variety. Once the evidence is abraded away it is called a die stage.
     
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