1960 D Penny oddity

Discussion in 'Error Coins' started by Carlw89, Jan 13, 2021 at 11:09 AM.

  1. Carlw89

    Carlw89 New Member

    I found this 1960 D penny, is this an error and if so what kind? 1960 D odd zero.jpg
     
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  3. Fred Weinberg

    Fred Weinberg Well-Known Member

    DD

    Damaged Digit

    Not an error, I'm sorry to say
     
  4. yakpoo

    yakpoo Member

    I see this error all the time on the Norwegian One Ore coin...

    [​IMG]
     
  5. yakpoo

    yakpoo Member

    You can call it "The Ghostbuster Cent"...

    [​IMG]
     
  6. yakpoo

    yakpoo Member

    Pretty cool, actually.
     
  7. yakpoo

    yakpoo Member

    Are you suggesting it's PMD? I doubt it.
     
  8. Fred Weinberg

    Fred Weinberg Well-Known Member

    I'm 100% certain of it
     
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  9. yakpoo

    yakpoo Member

    Edit: Never mind...it's not worth it.
     
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  10. Fred Weinberg

    Fred Weinberg Well-Known Member

    Attribution?

    OK, the digit is 'sliced'/damaged,
    and you can see part of the damage
    on the right side of the '6' also.

    What other kind of attribution are you looking for?
     
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  11. yakpoo

    yakpoo Member

    I agree...the "6" is definitely damage...but the "0" is clearly a die break/gouge of some sort. I agree that the "0" could be sliced/damaged...but on the die itself.

    Just look at the residual metal at the top of the "0" from 1:00-2:00. No way that's PMD.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2021 at 11:52 AM
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  12. Fred Weinberg

    Fred Weinberg Well-Known Member

    'residual metal' = damage
     
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  13. yakpoo

    yakpoo Member

    I've been wrong in the past. Let's wait for the experts to chime in.
     
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  14. VistaCruiser69

    VistaCruiser69 Well-Known Member

    Well defined die chip?
     
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  15. yakpoo

    yakpoo Member

    Are you suggesting that die cuds are PMD?

    Ok...I looked you up. You "should" know what you're talking about. However, unless you can offer any additional information, I'll have to trust my eyes and respectfully disagree.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2021 at 12:27 PM
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  16. Fred Weinberg

    Fred Weinberg Well-Known Member

    'Trust...but Verify' - Ronald Reagan
     
  17. charley

    charley Active Member

    .....who actually stole it from the soviets.
    now who do you trust, the original owner of the proverb, or the thief who stole it?
     
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  18. yakpoo

    yakpoo Member

    Could you at least explain how a "damaged digit" (post mint) results in raised metal perfectly blended with the flow of the metal that makes up the digit? How is that even possible? Is this an optical illusion?
     
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  19. Charles tresner

    Charles tresner New Member

    MR WEINBERG CUD COIN CU-25(P)22 VALUE OF THIS WAS?
     
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  20. Mountain Man

    Mountain Man Well-Known Member

    Welcome to CT Carl. That is definitely an odd coin and no matter what caused it, I would put it in a 2x2 and keep it. Good luck.
     
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  21. Oldhoopster

    Oldhoopster It seemed like a good idea at the time.

    Something like a coin roll crimping machine cuts into the raised top part of the 0 and pushes it over towards the center. Copper is soft/malleable and there have been pics of slanted digits and letters from roll crimping damage posted here in the past. As it circulates the sharper edges and scraped surface wear until those features are no longer visible and it looks like it was “as struck”. You can see some of the displaced metal at the top of the 0 as well.

    You can see a similar effect on some coins that suffered a thin cut/slice and continued to circulate. The displaced metal will wear down slightly and can cover the thin slit, leaving only a raised feature that can be mistaken for die damage.

    Sorry, I don’t have any pics to help with the explanation, but members may recall coins like this from past posts that are now in the archives
     
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