1951 NICKEL TOP OF THE 5 FILLED IN

Discussion in 'Coin Roll Hunting' started by SmokinJoe, Jan 21, 2021.

  1. SmokinJoe

    SmokinJoe Well-Known Member

    Just found this 1951 Nickel,came out of a Nickel roll....The top of the five is filled in.
    What do you Guys think caused that? SingleShot0000.jpg SingleShot0001.jpg SingleShot0002.jpg SingleShot0003.jpg
     
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  3. Silverpop

    Silverpop Well-Known Member

    could be a partly grease filled die, or a die chip IMHO
     
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  4. Heavymetal

    Heavymetal Supporter! Supporter

    Die break. Nice
    Not much value though
     
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  5. Kevin Mader

    Kevin Mader Fellow Coin Enthusiast

    @SmokinJoe Dies have a lifecycle or die stages. Normally, as they get to the latter part of their lives, they enter Late Die Stage and Very Late Die Stage before being decommissioned (or they catastrophically fail). The devices tend to get mushy and weak points (typically thin areas) will break. Those areas result in the filled devices like the 5 or often times...in mintmarks. Certain decades tend to be worse than others (like the 50s and 60s for nickels), but pretty much this happens to every die no matter what year/decade. A break can happen at an earlier stage to, relative to die conditioning, but the odds improve as they get older and used more. You'll also notice that this tends to happen on the Hammer die as opposed to the Anvil die.
     
  6. JeffC

    JeffC Never buying coin tubes with pull-off caps again. Supporter

    Just wondering: Is the Hammer die always the obverse and the Anvil die always the reverse?
     
  7. Dialupsux

    Dialupsux Well-Known Member

    Ballpark figure for the number of coins produced by 1 set of die ?
     
  8. eddiespin

    eddiespin Fast Eddie

    Chip in the old die
     
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  9. SensibleSal66

    SensibleSal66 Casual Collector / error expert "in Training "

    I agree , DIE CHIP .
     
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  10. Oldhoopster

    Oldhoopster It seemed like a good idea at the time.

    Generally yes. I recently read somewhere that there are some instances where it's switched, but didn't pay attention to the details. Sorry.

    I'm sure other members know this. It might be worth starting a new post. I'm guessing a lot of members would find the info interesting
     
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  11. eddiespin

    eddiespin Fast Eddie

    Yes. They do it upside-down. I don’t know why. Other than to say, I guess, why not?
     
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  12. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    It looks the way it does because it is worn and under that wear is a die chip.
     
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  13. SmokinJoe

    SmokinJoe Well-Known Member

  14. Kevin Mader

    Kevin Mader Fellow Coin Enthusiast

    @Oldhoopster is correct. Generally, the hammer die is the obverse and the anvil die the reverse. But I've also read that this isn't always the case.
     
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  15. Heavymetal

    Heavymetal Supporter! Supporter

    I’ve seen 70,000 estimated
    I’m sure it varies as pressure settings, size of coins, hardness of metal, misaligned dies and more factors come into play
    I’ll bet those steel wartime cents were tough on dies
     
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  16. Kevin Mader

    Kevin Mader Fellow Coin Enthusiast

    I'll add (and echo) hardness, composition, and speed.
     
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  17. Dialupsux

    Dialupsux Well-Known Member

    Interesting - is that like the output for 1 day
     
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  18. Kevin Mader

    Kevin Mader Fellow Coin Enthusiast

    Output per day is something like 16 million cents per mint. How that divides amongst equipment and dies is anybody's guess I suppose. But 70,000 cents would only take around 5 minutes to produce.
     
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  19. Dialupsux

    Dialupsux Well-Known Member

    Found this - 1 coin press can produce about 43,200 coins per Hour, Philly mint has 65 presses
     
  20. SmokinJoe

    SmokinJoe Well-Known Member

    Wow.....That's 2,808,000 coins an hour.....That deserves another Wow......
     
  21. Dialupsux

    Dialupsux Well-Known Member

    So dies would be changed several times a day if the press was running all day
     
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