1944 Wheat Penny Weighing 2.72g

Discussion in 'Error Coins' started by RabbiSchmooley, Jan 18, 2021.

  1. RabbiSchmooley

    RabbiSchmooley Active Member

    Another one wayyyyy out of tolerance. It has the weight of a steel penny, but to my eyes there is no way in **** this is a steel penny. The coloration is obviously all wrong for a steelie. Unless it's rusted badly. I feel like it is most likely just an unusually light/thin planchet, but I know next to nothing about coins as you all already know. What do you guys think?
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  3. furryfrog02

    furryfrog02 Well-Known Member

    Corroded. That's why the weight is off.
     
  4. Fred Weinberg

    Fred Weinberg Well-Known Member

    I second that emotion
     
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  5. RabbiSchmooley

    RabbiSchmooley Active Member

    Interesting. I figured corrosion would have worns away on the letters and date but they're all visible in fair definition on this penny. Thanks for the confirmation!
     
  6. furryfrog02

    furryfrog02 Well-Known Member

    Check out acid-dipped coins.
     
  7. Lueds

    Lueds Active Member

    Have you tried a magnet to it? Easily disposes of the Steelie idea.

    Having said that corrosion certainly is a probable cause, along with a thin planchet perhaps, how does it measure up size wise to a 'normal' wheatie? (I like to make sure we go through the process of elimination)
     
  8. Lueds

    Lueds Active Member

    This coin appears to have good definition in the devices, whereas acid dipped tend to have mushy devices. (Not saying it's not, just making an observation)
     
  9. RabbiSchmooley

    RabbiSchmooley Active Member

    I hadn't magnet tested it because I truly don't think it is a steel penny. I do think something is odd about it though. It is not magnetic, so again not a steelie. It is the same circumference as a normal wheat penny of the same year, but only about 3/4 as thick. And as I said the devices are very clear. I can take better pics if necessary.
     
  10. Fred Weinberg

    Fred Weinberg Well-Known Member

    Damaged surfaces, not any type of error.
     
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  11. RabbiSchmooley

    RabbiSchmooley Active Member

    I didn't miss the first comment, I just don't understand how corrosion could take 1/4 thickness off a penny and not affect the devices on either side. Can you explain that to me for my own understanding?
     
  12. Martha Lynn

    Martha Lynn Well-Known Member

    Perhaps it started out as a thin planchet somewhere on the low end of the tolerance. Add corrosion by environmental damage and it wouldn't take much to bring it down to where it is at now. I get your drift on the sharpness of the devices.
     
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  13. Fred Weinberg

    Fred Weinberg Well-Known Member

    It's not a quarter of the normal weight,
    it's 25% of a GRAM lighter. That's why
    you can see the design elements, but they
    are somewhat 'mushy' and the surfaces are
    wavy, and not normal.

    It's been chemically altered - I wasn't there
    when it happened, so I can't tell you the exact
    chemical, but I can assure you this is a common
    effect seen on C.A. copper coins.
     
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  14. RabbiSchmooley

    RabbiSchmooley Active Member

    I think I may have mispoke fred, my bad. When stacked next to a healthy penny it is roughly 3/4 as thick. That is what I meant, I didn't mean its weight. I appreciate the information and the time it takes out of your schedue to answer my questions.
     
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