1918-D Standing Liberty Quarter

Discussion in 'US Coins Forum' started by BigTee44, Apr 20, 2017.

  1. BigTee44

    BigTee44 Well-Known Member

    So I know that the early dates are more tricky to grade. Usually this would be about a XF so would that mean this could make an AU? Appears to have almost a FH.

    Just wanting to get some opinions on it.

    I think an acetone bath will get rid of some of the grim on it(face), but overall nice eye appeal. 1918-D Staning Liberty Quarter.jpg
     
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  3. SharonG

    SharonG Member

    When you say acetone do you mean like is in Polish remover and is it safe to use on any coin?
     
  4. BigTee44

    BigTee44 Well-Known Member

    100% pure acetone, not like nail polish remover.
     
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  5. SharonG

    SharonG Member

    Thank you and do I just dip it and take it out or is it safe to soak. I appreciate you sharing. How about using a cloth like I clean my rings and things with? Do they have chemicals that would be destructive?
     
  6. jtlee321

    jtlee321 Well-Known Member

    You don't ever want to wipe a coin. Soaking it in acetone (100% pure) is perfectly fine. When you remove it from the acetone you can rinse it under warm running water and then gently lay it on a soft cotton towel and pat it dry. You want the towel to be clean and have no chemicals added to it. Make sure not to rub or move the towel across the surface of the coin, there is a chance some debris can then be pushed into the surface and cause minor scratches.
     
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  7. SharonG

    SharonG Member

    Thank you for the heads up regarding not wiping a coin because that is exactly what I would have done. So much to learn..
     
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  8. Oldhoopster

    Oldhoopster It seemed like a good idea at the time.

    As a reminder, Acetone WILL NOT remove tarnish or toning. It will only remove dirt and other organic material stuck to the coin, like residue from PVC degradation, tape residue, etc. Toning is caused by a chemical reaction with the surface metal of the coin (simplified explanation). Acetone will not do anything to this.
     
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  9. ldhair

    ldhair Clean Supporter

    An acetone bath sounds like the right move. I'll guess XF-45.
     
  10. C-B-D

    C-B-D Well-Known Member

    I think it may make AU50, but never a full head.
     
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  11. ldhair

    ldhair Clean Supporter

    I can see AU-50. Nice coin. I'll bet the acetone will let more of the luster show.
     
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  12. Clawcoins

    Clawcoins Well-Known Member

    Using a cloth will introduce small scraps/scratches across the surface which devalues it. You can also remove the original surface Luster if vigorously done. Wiping rings wil also introduce small scratches though few people object to it. Many good jewelry places use an ultrasonic cleaner and don't/shouldn't wipe rings either.
     
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  13. kanga

    kanga 60 Year Collector Supporter

    COMMENTS:
    Acetone is dangerous; read and heed the label completely.
    "You don't ever want to wipe a coin." CORRECT
    "Soaking it in acetone (100% pure) is perfectly fine." CORRECT and time cannot harm the coin.
    "When you remove it from the acetone you can rinse it under warm running water..." INCORRECT - You want to use distilled water OR no rinse at all; acetone evaporates quickly.
    "... then gently lay it on a soft cotton towel and pat it dry. You want the towel to be clean and have no chemicals added to it." OKAY if you use distilled water BUT you want a lint-free cotton towel. I prefer to allow the acetone to evaporate by itself.
    "Make sure not to rub or move the towel across the surface of the coin..." CORRECT
     
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  14. jtlee321

    jtlee321 Well-Known Member

    This is not necessarily INCORRECT, if you live in an area with hard water, then you can introduce mineral contaminants, but nothing significant. I live in an area with very clean water, so this would be location dependent. Is it preferable to use distilled water? Yes, but not necessary. If I have left a coin that had a lot of grime and dirt soaking in acetone, I would never just let the acetone evaporate. Doing that will allow whatever contaminates that were suspended in the acetone to redeposit on the surface of the coin. You can either dip it in fresh clean acetone or rinse under water. If you rinse in clean acetone, then you can let it just evaporate.
     
  15. Insider

    Insider Talent on loan from...

    @SharonG

    For the majority of folks, "Coins" + "Investment" = Big Fat ZERO. :jawdrop:

    For the others: "Coins" + "Hobby" = Longer life, fun, friends, enjoyment, learning, relaxation (except when bidding in an auction), etc. :joyful:

    PS Welcome to this place.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2017
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