1913 Bavaria "Pattern" 2 Mark (by Goetz)

Discussion in 'World Coins' started by brg5658, Nov 7, 2016.

  1. brg5658

    brg5658 Supporter! Supporter

    There are many pieces engraved by Karl Goetz that I find artistically (and historically) interesting -- but among all of his designs, his many variations of the eagle are, in my opinion, his artistic best. He captures something so elegant about the eagle, and the detail he puts into the feathers, talons, stance, etc. is stunning.

    An example of the 2 Mark Goetz "unofficial" pattern has long been on my want list. I had this particular example on my watch list on eBay for quite some time, and finally pulled the trigger last week. It arrived this last weekend, and I had a chance to photograph it this evening.

    Please feel free to post your examples from the extensive set of "patterns" that Goetz produced.

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  3. Numismat

    Numismat World coin enthusiast

    I agree about the eagle design, very interesting use of art nouveau style that was still popular at the time these were made.
     
  4. chrisild

    chrisild Coin Collector

    Most of Goetz's medals are political propaganda pieces, and I am not exactly fond of them. His coin designs - none of them was ever picked for an actual coin - are not that bad, but I have no idea why in this case he displayed the Prussian eagle so prominently, with a very asymmetric ;) German eagle above it. According to the Schaaf catalog, he also had 3M and 5M designs minted, all in various metals.

    Christian
     
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  5. spirityoda

    spirityoda Coin Junky Supporter

  6. brg5658

    brg5658 Supporter! Supporter

    The 1913 "patterns" were minted in "denominations" of 2, 3, 5, 10, and 20 Marks. They were minted in metals bronze, bronzed-copper, copper, silver plated copper, silver, and gold (the silver and gold pieces were limited to quantities of 5 pieces each).

    The later 1925 "patterns" were minted in denominations of only 2, 3, and 5 Marks (maybe that's what you're looking at in Schaaf?).
     
  7. Numismat

    Numismat World coin enthusiast

    This always seemed odd to me as the two metals often look similar. Maybe not fresh off the press though.
     
  8. Zohar444

    Zohar444 Member

    That coin pops!
     
  9. brg5658

    brg5658 Supporter! Supporter

    My understanding of "bronzed-copper" (at least how it was applied to Conder tokens) was a copper planchet, onto which was applied bronze powder at the time of striking. I agree with you that they can be difficult to differentiate, and for all intents and purposes are basically copper pieces.

    The surfaces of bronzed-copper pieces tend to be iridescent, less "red", and likely protected from (blotchy, spotty, unsightly) oxidation more than pure copper. My avatar happens to be what's described as a "bronzed copper proof" token. You can certainly see the bronzing effect when tilted into the light just right.


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  10. chrisild

    chrisild Coin Collector

    No, I just forgot to look for the "gold" numbers. ;) For those not familiar with Schaaf's way of numbering the patterns: He used the Jaeger catalog number and added his own G/design or M/material numbers for the patterns he found.

    Christian
     
  11. Jaelus

    Jaelus The Hungarian Antiquarian Supporter

    Really nice piece. I've been looking for an original Goetz 1914 probe krone. I'm assuming you've checked out karlgoetz.com?

    Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
     
  12. brg5658

    brg5658 Supporter! Supporter

    Yep, I've been to that site many times over the years.
     
  13. Jaelus

    Jaelus The Hungarian Antiquarian Supporter

    Is your pattern an original or one of the "restrikes" done by his son? I think the restrikes have an edge stamp. I don't believe any of the TPGs differentiate.
     
  14. brg5658

    brg5658 Supporter! Supporter

    No edge stamp, original as far as I know. I have found no mention of the 1913 pieces having been restruck by his son...care to offer a link to that?
     
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