1869 three cent nickel proof?

Discussion in 'US Coins Forum' started by Kevin Farley, Jul 14, 2020.

  1. Kevin Farley

    Kevin Farley Member

    Is this 1869 three cent Nickel a proof?
     

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  3. Robert Ransom

    Robert Ransom Well-Known Member

    Appears to have been gold plated at one time. If so, the value is what someone is willing to pay. IMO but I could be wrong. Allow others to chime in.
     
    NOS likes this.
  4. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    The left one is dated 1869 and it's been gold plated. The right one is dated 1865. Neither one is a proof.
     
  5. Kevin Farley

    Kevin Farley Member

    Why would it have been gold plated and who would have done it? Is that a common thing?
     
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  6. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    From your photos it looks like it was plated and now it's wearing off. Who knows why but plating is a fairly common thing. The most famous plating on a coin was the Liberty or V Nickel. Look it up as it fascinating.
     
    Robert Ransom likes this.
  7. Robert Ransom

    Robert Ransom Well-Known Member

    @Kevin Farley Great read. You definitely look it up.
     
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  8. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    Like I said, it is fascinating.
     
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  9. Robert Ransom

    Robert Ransom Well-Known Member

    And now we have the coins from China to muddy the water.
     
    Kevin Farley likes this.
  10. thomas mozzillo

    thomas mozzillo Well-Known Member

    @Kevin Farley. Welcome to Coin Talk. Look on eBay and see how many plated coins are for sale. Most, if not all, collectors consider a plated coin as damaged.
     
    Robert Ransom likes this.
  11. jgrinz

    jgrinz Senior Member

    Same reason as the nickel - There is nothing on these coins that say CENTS. So they were plated and attempted to be passed off as 3 dollars.
     
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  12. Conder101

    Conder101 Numismatist

    Probably wouldn't have worked very well, the size difference was way too great. It worked for the racketeer nickel because the nickel was 21.2 mm in diameter and the half eagle was 21.5 mm. The three cent nickel was 17.9 mm in diameter and the three dollar gold was 20.6 mm.
     
    Robert Ransom likes this.
  13. Robert Ransom

    Robert Ransom Well-Known Member

    What about the newbies? Does what I wrote even make "cents."
     
  14. C-B-D

    C-B-D Well-Known Member

  15. Conder101

    Conder101 Numismatist

    Are there a lot of newbies buying 3 dollar gold pieces?
     
    Robert Ransom likes this.
  16. Michael K

    Michael K Well-Known Member

    I don't know about gold plated.
    But, it looks like it was some kind of "gold wash".
    Agree with post #10:
    And perhaps they tried to pass it off as a 3 dollar gold coin.
     
  17. Robert Ransom

    Robert Ransom Well-Known Member

    Could be. There are a lot of new members and based on their questions, I would surmise many are young...
     
  18. Conder101

    Conder101 Numismatist

    Well considering 3 dollar golds will cost them over $1000 apiece and up, if they are will to drop that kind of money on something they can't recognize, then Caveat Emptor.

    If they ask first I'll be happy to help them anyway I can, but if they buy first and ask questions later I'll advise, but I won't feel sorry for them.
     
    Robert Ransom likes this.
  19. Robert Ransom

    Robert Ransom Well-Known Member

    There's the rub. Offer them at $300-400 with some BS about liquidation or stock sale, etc.
     
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