1822 Norwegian Skilling major error?

Discussion in 'What's it Worth' started by Reversecourse, May 13, 2018.

  1. Reversecourse

    Reversecourse New Member

    I have an 1822 2 Skilling Species from Norway that has split in two but in the strangest of ways. One half overlaps onto the other so when put together, the two halves meet up perfectly. This coin has been in a box for at least the past 50 years with some other foreign coins my dad had. If you look closely, the right side of the coin also has a crack but that crack did not go all the way through and separate. Any ideas as to what kind of error this could be? The fact that the two halves are still together after almost 200 years is pretty amazing to me. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
     

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  3. alurid

    alurid Well-Known Member

    I would say your coin will fall into a "Lamination" type of error. I have never seen one extreme as yours. Looks like some kind of a cookie broken in half.
    You may have trouble finding info due to it being scarce.
     
  4. longshot

    longshot Enthusiast Supporter

    I would think the planchet was defective. A lot of these are pretty crude. Very interesting.
     
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  5. Reversecourse

    Reversecourse New Member

    Thanks. I have looked and looked but can't find anything similar anywhere. I took it to a coin shop near my house and the guy hadn't seen anything like it either. Do you think it would be worth it to send it in to be graded?
     
  6. Reversecourse

    Reversecourse New Member

    Pardon my ignorance but can you tell me what you mean by "crude"?
     
  7. longshot

    longshot Enthusiast Supporter

    Basically, I guess I've just observed that these often seem to show strike weakness in some areas, sometimes not perfectly centered, etc. They don't appear to have been made with much care... I really have no idea what kind of equipment was used, or how the planchets were made.
     
  8. Reversecourse

    Reversecourse New Member

    Ahh. I see. Thanks for clarifying. I have more research to do.
     
  9. alurid

    alurid Well-Known Member

    I think you will have to find a value, to determine if it is worth being graded.
     
  10. Reversecourse

    Reversecourse New Member

    Sorry to bother you, but can you point me in the right direction as to where I might go to find the value of this coin? That would be a much appreciated big help.
     
  11. Numismat

    Numismat World coin enthusiast Supporter

    Unfortunately in that condition it's only worth a few dollars.

    These early Norwegian coppers are notorious for awful strike and planchet quality, as @longshot noted. This one is definitely on the extreme end of the spectrum. However, because such errors/issues are typical it makes the coins worth less rather than more as is sometimes the case with types made under high quality standards.
     
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  12. alurid

    alurid Well-Known Member

    I do not think you will find a set value for this coin. An estimate maybe.
    And as with most things it is only worth what someone is willing to pay.
    You would have to find the right person that really wants it.
    E-bay listings may give some you idea.
    Numismat really gave you the best answer.
     
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