$100 Union (George T Morgan)

Discussion in 'Coin Chat' started by Chuck_A, Aug 17, 2019.

  1. Chuck_A

    Chuck_A Member

    The $100 and $50 gold Union and Half Union proposed in 1854 by San Francisco bankers and businessmen never came to be but detailed drawings of the coins by George T Morgan were found at the Smithsonian Institution and were produced by a private mint in gold and silver. Your thoughts please on this type of coin and potential value other than spot?
     
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  3. Oldhoopster

    Oldhoopster It seemed like a good idea at the time.

    The modern gold reissues in high grade TPG slabs seem to sell for a little bit over spot in the Heritage Auction archives.

    My non-expert opinion would be that these would trade for near spot unless you found a buyer that had to have it (assuming it's in a slab).
     
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  4. Chuck_A

    Chuck_A Member

    Thank You, the Morgan design is beautiful on the ultra cameo gold edition. The one that I saw was in the original issue box with an ungraded ngc slab stating "gem proof ultra cameo"
     
  5. Johndoe2000$

    Johndoe2000$ Well-Known Member

    These are medallions/rounds, not coins.
    I agree with near spot prices.
    Don't be bothered with the 70 graded pieces. Gem, or Pf69 will be fine.
    Welcome aboard.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2019
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  6. Conder101

    Conder101 Numismatist

    They aren't coins and in my opinion they are not even well done. They are no different from a bullion round and I feel should be priced the same.
     
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  7. Chuck_A

    Chuck_A Member

    Thank you for the reply
     
  8. Chuck_A

    Chuck_A Member

    I also believe the bullion price is correct and should not be listed as coins however they are not marked as required by the hobbies act? Is there an exemption for private mints to show a dollar amount? A picture wasn't available if it is marked on the edge.
     
  9. Conder101

    Conder101 Numismatist

    Personally I feel they are in violation of the HPA as I read it.
     
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  10. Chuck_A

    Chuck_A Member

    I'm new and not sure what HPA is? Thank you, I love new things to learn.
     
  11. Silverhouse

    Silverhouse Well-Known Member

    Hobby Protection Act I think.... HPA
     
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  12. Chuck_A

    Chuck_A Member

    Would the hobbies protection act apply if the "item" is in an and verified NGC slab that states the precious metals content? Without seeing the edge I can't comment on if it is marked or not, it's not shown on any I've seen.
     
  13. Chuck_A

    Chuck_A Member

    Thank you all for your help. I did win a 5oz. .999 gold 1876 $100 Union for$550 under spot. Unfortunately I haphazardly placed a bid I did not think I would win. A good deal? Gold is on the increase however I'm into numismatics for the history and beauty of the coins including some foreign issues, not bullion. The things I am learning are fantastic and I wish I would have started numismatics 55 years ago when I was 8 and got my first Morgan dollar as a paperboy when it was common to find silver in change. I inherited 2 small collections and didn't have a clue what to do with them, I actually thought it would easy, much to my shigrin its not a an easy hobby at all but I've challenged myself throughout my life. I love to learn and study things in depth in the many areas I've encountered and this hobby is no different. I love the hobby and for the most part the people in it excepting the plethora of thieves. Thank you in advance for the questions i'll likely have in the future.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2019
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  14. Conder101

    Conder101 Numismatist

    There is no exception in the Hobby Protection Act that waives compliance if it is an NGC slab. :)
     
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