Unstamped Coin

Discussion in 'What's it Worth' started by DivinusArma, Sep 10, 2011.

  1. DivinusArma

    DivinusArma New Member

    I was going through a lot of coins and found a penny that wasn't stamped on the back or front, I was wandering if it had any irregular value?
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  3. phdunay

    phdunay Member

    It is called a planchet it if has raised rims, they sell for between $1 and $3 depending on their condition.
  4. jloring

    jloring Senior Citizen

  5. DivinusArma

    DivinusArma New Member

    Thanks for the info and such quick replies, also, I just came into a rather large coin collection and have no idea how to tell the difference between things that are hundreds of dollars to the rest. I know that there is a red book, but is there anything else online that could give me some idea of what I'm doing?
  6. gboulton

    gboulton 7070 56.98 pct complete

    http://numismedia.com/

    http://www.pcgs.com/prices/

    http://www.pcgs.com/photograde/

    http://www.acoin.com/grading.htm

    T
    here are some starting points. By NO means should you take any of the prices you might see as gospel...they're a guideline, nothing more. And by no means are the two grading links comprehensive or complete, they are, again, a starting point.

    While the links above won't appraise the collection for you, what they WILL do is begin to give you some idea of what you may have of value, vs what you may have that's common and less valuable. This, at least, will serve to point you in the right directions for doing further research, or asking more specific questions, about particular coins, types or sets you may have.

    Hope that helps, and :welcome: to CT!
  7. jloring

    jloring Senior Citizen

    Well, since numismatic value is based on the grade of a coin, you can do a little photo grading here:

    http://www.pcgs.com/photograde/

    Just click on the series you want to see and compare your coins to the pictures.
  8. phdunay

    phdunay Member

    What kinds of cents are there? If there are Lincoln Wheat Cents, look for 1922 D, 1909, 1909 S, 1909 S V.D.B., 1914 D, 1931 S, anything red or high grade and a whole bunch of errors, like a 1955 Doubled Die, which is easily identified but very rare. To learn about errors, you need a special book, there are many of them.
  9. jloring

    jloring Senior Citizen

    Oh well, gboulton beat me to it, LOL.
  10. DivinusArma

    DivinusArma New Member

    I have a varied large collection of mint sets and commemorative coins, so I'm defiantly going to check these sites out and maybe pick up a coin collecting for dummies book.
  11. gboulton

    gboulton 7070 56.98 pct complete

    For what it's worth...Red Book IS "Coin Collecting for Dummies" *heh*

    Be aware..nothing says you have to have the most current copy...only thing that gets you is a more recent wild-***ed totally inaccurate guess at price. :)

    ANY edition will have mintages, grading guides, images, and discussion about the various coins you're likely to encounter...and this is where the value of the guide is.
  12. DivinusArma

    DivinusArma New Member

    I have coins that say MS70 and I cant really get a price for most of them. Any reason why?
  13. gboulton

    gboulton 7070 56.98 pct complete

    What do you mean the coins "say MS70"? Can you give us a picture or more detailed description? (Pictures would be best...even just quick snapshots showing the coin and complete "holder" or whatever it's in) Are they in plastic holders with labels? if so, what company graded them? Are they in cardboard or mylar flips, with "MS70" written on them by someone? What?

    As for not being able to get prices, most likely you're trying to look up coins that there's simply no basis for a price at that grade...that is to say, nobody's ever encountered or offered a perfect MS70 example of the coin for sale, so no way to establish a price.

    Before you get your hopes too high, be aware...for those in that category, the likelihood is EXTREMELY high, by the way, that you haven't encountered an MS70 example either, and whoever assigned the "MS-70" to those coins you're holding overgraded them, perhaps by several points.
  14. DivinusArma

    DivinusArma New Member

    I'm not exactly positive where they came from but a lot of the coins I have are uncirculated, I don't have the collection in front of me but I think They came from the department of treasury, but like I said I don't have them in front of me. I'll snap a shot tomorrow when I'm in front of them.
  15. cpm9ball

    cpm9ball Cannot Re-Member

    The Red Book doesn't list values for 70's because the sales history can be very sporadic. So, it is pointless to devote columns where no values are available. You might try searching the Numismedia or PCGS price guides, but even those aren't totally accurate. You might also try completed eBay auctions.

    Chris
  16. DivinusArma

    DivinusArma New Member

  17. phdunay

    phdunay Member

    SGS is an illegitimate grading company, their grades are not to be taken seriously and are seemingly made up on the spot.
  18. DivinusArma

    DivinusArma New Member

    Alright, thank you for the information guys, like I said I'm really new to this and I appreciate all the help.
  19. gboulton

    gboulton 7070 56.98 pct complete

    Ahhh yes. Star Grading Services. *heh* A company that, according to their own website, "specializ[es] in grades 60 to 70, both Proof and MS"

    Indeed, there's an article here documenting an SGS coin graded PR70 CAMEO that had fingerprints and notable scratches on it. :)

    So...yes...the person grading that coin was probably incorrect. I suppose it's POSSIBLE it actually IS an MS70 coin (Your pictures aren't anywhere near clear enough to be sure) and SGS got lucky...but the chances are extremely high that it's simply a circulated 2006 quarter, of no value beyond $0.25.

    What, sadly, you've just run into is the fact that a great many grading companies exist that claim high standards, but have none. They exist strictly to award desirable grades...for a fee of course...and unscrupulous sellers/dealers will use these inflated grades to sell what is, in reality, an inexpensive, cheap, or trashed coin for a much higher price.

    The article I linked above gives a breakdown of some of the various "TPGs" (Third Party Graders). You'll note most in the hobby will concur with that breakdown...at the top there's PCGS and NGC, and then somewhere near or around the top (depends on who you ask) are ANACS and ICG, and then there's "everybody else".

    This isn't to say that some of the "everybody elses" might not be TRYING to do honest grading with high standards...they simply don't have the reputation that the higher tier TPGs do...reputations earned over many years of demanding critics agreeing with their analysis of coins...and, in some cases, even backed by guarantees of a coin's value and/or grade.

    Your best bet here, at this point, is to buckle down, and do the research. You've been given a lot of resources in this thread...use them. Take several weeks, catalog what you have, and use the links/books/etc here to determine which coins have potential, which ones don't, etc. Take good, sharp, crisp pictures of any you have questions about (there are several threads here at CT about good picture taking, even without expensive equipment) and start threads here asking about them. :)

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