1976 2 Two dollar bill with issue date of April 06 1976

Discussion in 'Paper Money' started by spooge285, Oct 18, 2012.

  1. spooge285

    spooge285 New Member

    Going through my late father's coin and paper money collection I found a 1976 2 dollar bill postmarked April 06, 1976, I had thought they weren't issued until April 13, 1976.
    Anyone have an idea what this would be worth???
    Thanks in advance
    Larry
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  3. Witty38

    Witty38 Member

    Whether or not the first day of issue date is significant or has increased value depends partly on the authenticity of $2 note itself. You would have to have it graded as genuine to make sure. CGA does this. www.cganotes.com/ but it's going to cost you probably most of the anticipated value unless it is determined to be an "error" IMO.

    You can always try and sell it on eBay to determine its worth but the April 13, 1976 ones are going for about $6 each. I don't think most of these collectors are savvy enough to notice the earlier date unless pointed out as an error if indeed it is.

    The ultimate value of course would depend on collector demand and soliciting bids is one way to do that.

    Otherwise, if you haven't already, take it to you local coin/currency dealer and see if he thinks the "date" stamped on the note is significant. Let us know what you find out!
  4. clayirving

    clayirving Supporter**

    I've never seen a Series 1976 $2 FRN First Day of Issue note with an Apr 6, 1976 postmark — That's a week early. Apparently, some notes must have leaked out prior to the first day of issue. I have one with an Apr 12, 1976 postmark.

    [​IMG]
  5. spooge285

    spooge285 New Member

    Clay...any thoughts about a value?
  6. Dave M

    Dave M Francophiliac

    I hate to bring up the other possibility, which I unfortunately think is far more likely. That the date stamp on the cancel was accidentally, or purposely set too early.

    Dave
  7. clayirving

    clayirving Supporter**

    I purchased the note with the Apr 12, 1976 postmark for $6.97 in Jan 2012, so it didn't bring much of a premium. Maybe most people didn't notice the postmark was a day before the first day of issue. It is difficult to place a value on your note because it is unique note. I would guess that you may be able to get somewhere in the range of $10 to $20 for it on eBay if you present it correctly.
  8. clayirving

    clayirving Supporter**

    Really? The USPS is pretty strict with their postmarks. I think it is unlikely that a post office would have their postmark date off by one week.

    From the USPS:

    A postmark is an official Postal Service™ imprint applied in black ink on the address side of a stamped mailpiece. A postmark indicates the location and date the Postal Service accepted custody of a mailpiece, and it cancels affixed postage. Since 1979, the Postal Service’s Postal Operations Manual (POM) has provided standards for postmarks applied to single-piece First-Class Mail®. Letters and flats that need to be postmarked come from carrier pick-up, collection boxes, retail counters, or lobby drop boxes. Postmarks are not required for mailings bearing a permit, meter, or precanceled stamp for postage, nor to pieces with an indicia applied by various postage evidencing systems.

    The postmarking process uses the following three basic methods of imprinting:​
    • Automated: Advanced facer canceller systems used by processing distribution centers cancel letters quickly. These machines are equipped with biohazard detection systems so letters postmarked by automation benefit from added safety measures.​
    • Mechanized: A variety of older devices apply postmarks to flat-size mailpieces and to philatelic pieces.​
    • Manual: Hand-stamp devices are used by Postal Service employees for local cancellation or philatelic requests.​
    A “local” postmark shows the full name of the Post Office, a two-letter state abbreviation, ZIP Code™, and date of mailing. Because the Postal Service is sensitive to the importance some customers place upon these postmarks, each Post Office is required to make a local postmark available. Lobby drops should be designated for this purpose with clear signage signifying its use.​
  9. desertgem

    desertgem MODERATOR Senior Errer Collecktor Moderator

    This could be possible as the town ( village) only had less than 2400 population in 2010, and small town postoffices often didn't change stamps date regularly. Not saying it is so, but to be considered. the price would obviously be linked to the authenticity of the date, as stamped $2 1976 bills are very common.

    Welcome to the forum Larry!

    Jim
  10. Dave M

    Dave M Francophiliac

    I used to be much more into stamp collecting, and can tell you that in 1976 it was certainly quite possible to simply ask the clerk at the counter to set the date on the handstamp (which those are). Odds are quite good, especially if he was your buddy, that he'd do it.

    They may have tightened up a lot in the last 35 years, but at that time, a cancel with a wrong date on it (e.g a first day cover with a similar early date) was not likely be an actual early release of the stamps, rather a "mistake" from the postal clerk.

    Edit: also keep in mind that these, first day covers, and the like, were known to be "trinkets" that the clerk was processing, and they knew it wasn't something that was going in the mail or otherwise would be accountable as regards delivery time, etc. The clerk was just there to make the customers happy with their purchase.

    Dave
  11. clayirving

    clayirving Supporter**

    Dave, I bow to your experience and knowledge. I think the only thing we can do is classify the postmark as "unknown and unverifiable", and probably a postal clerk "error".

    I still think my estimate of $10 to $20 on eBay is correct because it's a unique note. I have a pretty good pulse on the value of Series 1976 $2 First Day of Issue FRNs since I currently have 1,142 of them. :smile
  12. Dave M

    Dave M Francophiliac

    I agree, there's value in it just because of the oddity. If you haven't seen one with such an early date, I bet there aren't too many more!

    I got one of these $2 notes at the time, in a folder, and have looked for it a couple times over the last year with the intent on sending it your way. I have yet to find it unfortunately. It's probably not an unusual one in any case.

    Dave
  13. clayirving

    clayirving Supporter**

    If you can't find it, you can always send some of your beautiful French notes my way! :smile
  14. spooge285

    spooge285 New Member

    1976 2 dollar bill issue date

    First off THANK YOU for all of the responses to my inquiry and the words of welcome to the forum !! My lovely wife called the post office in question and was told the Postmaster changes the date on the hand-stamp canceler each day as required by "Postal rules" in fear of the wrath of the postal inspector . The clerks 's name is withheld by her request but has been with USPS for 39 years and at that post office for 37 of them. The lucky point is, her husband collects stamps and she remembers the lines of people coming in for cancelations; she doesn't recall this bill exactly but did recall that a few did come in early but never asked how the person acquired them.
    I guess this could open another can of worms and take the direction on how could someone get the bills early??? Did the banks receive them early to hold for April 15 1976 ???? I wonder; if this was true that someone removed 1976 dated bills and replaced them with the older style to make the daily cash count total correct ???
    Ponder this if you will.
    Thanks in advance!
    Larry
  15. COINnoisseur

    COINnoisseur Professional Amateur

    I'm new to paper currency, is the postmark on the actual bill or the plastic sleeve?
  16. spooge285

    spooge285 New Member

    2 dollar bill

    Hi....Welcome.....It's on the bill itself.
    Larry

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