1935A "R" and "S'" Experimental notes?

Discussion in 'Paper Money' started by greglax45, Dec 30, 2008.

  1. greglax45

    greglax45 Coin Hoarder

    As I look through one of my currency books, I see that for the Series of 1935 A, there were experimmental "R" and "S" notes with those letters on a note.

    What is the history behind these letters?
    Were these notes made with different kinds of fibers?
    Anyone have an example of this note?

    Thanks,
    Greg
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  3. RickieB

    RickieB Expert Plunger Sniper

    Greg...
    From what I know, there was paper shortage during the WWars and the Gov had some experimental notes also the emergency notes with the Hawaii overprint with brown seals.
    These were made (Hawaii) so if the notes fell into the hands of the enemythey would be known and could be deemed worthless!

    The red "R and S" were different papers from what I understand. If anyone else knows anything, please pipe in.

    Regards,


    RickieB
  4. Magman

    Magman U.S. Money Collector

    Rickie, I apologize, but I don't follow.
    What's the Hawaii emergency notes have to do with the experimental notes?
  5. RickieB

    RickieB Expert Plunger Sniper

    Magman....

    From my understanding of this during the WWII the US Gov produced 4 short lived Silver Certs. 2 of the four were issued with unique seals of different colors so that they could be decalred worthless if the were to fall into the hands of the enemy.
    Of the 4, 2 were exprimental and the most uncommon of them is the red "R" meaning regular and the red "S" meaning special paper. These two note were used on the 2 different paper types.

    The $1 North Afrcia Notes were produced for the "Operation Torch" in the invasion of North Afrcia in 1942.

    All four of the notes have the Series of 1935, however they were issued only briefly during WWII.

    The note with the red "R" in chcu will run you about $750-800 USD
    The red "S" slightly less!

    Thas all I know...I cant recall where I read this...


    Hey!! That could be a cool Paper Money#3 Contest question...LOL

    Regards,

    Attached Files:

  6. Smaugy

    Smaugy Peg Leg Surfing

    Actually I can add a bit to this -- I had just recently picked up a Series 1935 Experimental Silver Certificate that doesn't have the red "R" or "S". Here is what I found:

    "The first experiment was conducted in January and February 1933 to test different ratios of cotton and linen used in the paper of dollar bills. Series of 1928A and 1928B $1 Silver Certificates with serial number block letters X-B and Y-B were used as the experimental group; the Z-B block was used as the control group. Test results were inconclusive."

    "Another test was done in 1937 which was similar in style to the 1933 experiment. Series 1935 one-dollar bills were used once again. The particular notes used in this experiment can be identified by their serial numbers. Notes ranging from A00000001B–A06180000B and B00000001B–B03300000B were the experimental group and notes ranging from C00000001B–C03300000B were part of the control group. No conclusive results were found."

    "A more well-known test was done in 1942 during World War II to test alternative types of paper; this was a precautionary measure in case the current type of paper supply could not be maintained. Series 1935A notes made of the special paper were printed with a red "S" to the right of the treasury seal and notes of the control group were printed with a red "R". Fake red S's and R's have been applied to regular Series 1935A notes to try and pass them at a higher value; checking a note's serial numbers can prevent this. Serial numbers of the R group range from S70884001C–S7206800C and serial numbers of the S group range from S73884001C–S7506800C."

    Here is my 1935 Experimental note that I picked up recently.....I was going to post a different thread but figured I would chime in here:

    Attached Files:

  7. RickieB

    RickieB Expert Plunger Sniper

    Thats some Great information Smaugy...Thank you!
    are you interested in going to the New England Currency Club Meeting ?
    Let me know...it is the first Monday evening in Jan.

    Regards,

    RickieB
  8. Smaugy

    Smaugy Peg Leg Surfing

    Would love to say yes, but am still under the weather on the leg.....probably in March I might be able to think about it...thanks for asking though....

    Smaugy
  9. RickieB

    RickieB Expert Plunger Sniper

    March it is...will not take no for an answer...LOL
    Get well Sir!!


    RickieB
  10. ziggy9

    ziggy9 *NEC SPERNO NEC TIMEO*

    Where does the New England Currency Club meet?
  11. greglax45

    greglax45 Coin Hoarder

    Thank you Smaugy and RickieB for awesome information. How present are the experimental notes w/ no "R' or "S" on the market today? Are they expensive/ do many people who may sell them know what they are selling?

    I may have to look into a 1928 experimental note one day!

    greg
  12. RickieB

    RickieB Expert Plunger Sniper

    [​IMG]

    My pleasure Greg....Smaugy had some great info huh??

    I am sure most dealers who know their stuff have knowledge of these...heck I am just a collector and knew a little bit..LOL

    Cant wait to see the note when you add it your collection...
    Save that allowance and pick up some snow shoveling jobs this winter!!


    RickieB
  13. lettow

    lettow Senior Member

    The anticipated shortage of paper due to WWII was premised on a shortage of cotton used to make the paper for US currency by Crane & Co. The shortage never happened in part because the BEP and Crane & Co. found an unlikely source for cotton rags for making the paper -- worn out and discarded US military uniforms.
  14. RickieB

    RickieB Expert Plunger Sniper

    Now that is some interesting info!

    Thank you!

    Regards,

    RickieB
  15. greglax45

    greglax45 Coin Hoarder

    Wow! That is amazing. Have they ever thought of reusing worn/unusable paper money that they shred, for new currency bills?

    Greg
  16. lettow

    lettow Senior Member

    From what I understand about the process that Crane uses for making paper for US currency, the ink on macerated notes prevents them from being re-used for currency because it affects the quality of the paper produced.
  17. Magman

    Magman U.S. Money Collector

    ohh ok, I get it now Rickie :)

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