1825 large diameter bust quarter

Discussion in 'US Coins Forum' started by NorCal, Feb 11, 2022.

  1. NorCal

    NorCal Well-Known Member

    Found this beauty today at my lcs. Only the second large bust quarter that I have seen in person. Does anybody know what variety this is? Thanks A004E08E-CEC7-49D5-B4A6-8DD5A9F31CDF.jpeg 93E68479-83BC-41C8-B6E0-E596A6CBA6BC.jpeg
     
    longshot and NSP like this.
  2. Avatar

    Guest User Guest



    to hide this ad.
  3. SensibleSal66

    SensibleSal66 U.S Casual Collector / Error Collector

    1825 Capped Bust Quarter.
    " Browning-2 is the most common of the three 1825 Quarters and shows a low eighth star on the obverse and a small “5” on the reverse. There are 2 other scarce varieties. Browning-3 is considerably scarce and shows the same obverse as seen on Browning-2 but is paired with a Large 5 reverse. Across the board and regardless of grade, the 1825/4/2 Quarter is a decidedly rare coin."
    Taken from PCGS website and general search.
     
    David Betts, CoinJockey73 and NorCal like this.
  4. NSP

    NSP Well-Known Member

    The die marriage is Browning-2, which is the most common of the three die marriages known for this date. Two obverse dies and three reverse dies were used to make these three die marriages.

    Regarding the overdate, depending on the reference, you’ll see overdates like 1825/2, 1825/3, 1825/4, 1825/4/2, 1825/4/3, 1825/4/(2), etc. In reality, all three die marriages are actually 1825/4/2, though this may not be readily apparent when you look at the date.
     
    Pickin and Grinin and Paddy54 like this.
  5. Paddy54

    Paddy54 Hey brother can you spare a half dime?

    "Regarding the overdate, depending on the reference, you’ll see overdates like 1825/2, 1825/3, 1825/4, 1825/4/2, 1825/4/3, 1825/4/(2), etc. In reality, all three die marriages are actually 1825/4/2, though this may not be readily apparent when you look at the date."


    Good information thanks, it nice to have someone who actually knows what they talking about...explain the variety in details in their post.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2022
    NSP likes this.
  6. NorCal

    NorCal Well-Known Member

    Thanks for the replies. I didn’t go to the lcs looking for bust quarters but my plans changed quick when I saw a large quarter
     
  7. ksparrow

    ksparrow Coin Hoarder Supporter

    Nice one!
     
    NorCal likes this.
  8. NorCal

    NorCal Well-Known Member

    Common is a relative term for this one. Pcgs estimates 237 survivors
     
  9. NSP

    NSP Well-Known Member

    The 237 survivor estimate is one of the more glaring examples of how inaccurate PCGS’s survival estimates can be. The PCGS population report shows 794 examples, and the NGC census shows 398. Granted, these numbers are inflated by crossovers and resubmissions, but there are almost certainly far more than 237 coins in PCGS and NGC holders. I suspect that the actual number of surviving examples is somewhere in the neighborhood of 2500.

    One possible explanation for the 237 figure is that maybe PCGS originally chose that number for one of the three die marriages back when they were all recognized as different overdates. Then, once it was determined that all three die marriages were actually 1825/4/2, they adjusted their CoinFacts website to only list “1825/4/2”, but didn’t adjust the survival estimate accordingly. That’s just speculation on my part, though.
     
  10. Jeffjay

    Jeffjay Well-Known Member

    Very nice coin. And almost 200 years old!
     
  11. NorCal

    NorCal Well-Known Member

    I always take the pcgs population estimate with a grain of salt. Still happy to have it.
     
Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page