Constantius Gallus - FEL TEMP - Horseman - Trier

Discussion in 'Ancient Coins' started by maridvnvm, Dec 11, 2021.

  1. maridvnvm

    maridvnvm Well-Known Member

    I know many collectors look down on FEL TEMP coins and fallen horsemen in particular but some of us still like them. Trier examples are amongst the most difficult to obtain and this is the first of Constantius Gallus that I have been able to get. On this one the engraver has mixed up the P at the end of TEMP with the R at the start of REPARATIO.

    Obv:– DN CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, Bare, bust draped and cuirassed right; A behind
    Rev:– FEL TEMR (sic) PE-PARATIO (sic), Soldier spearing fallen horseman, who is bare helmeted, reaching back towards emperor
    Minted in Trier (//TRP),
    Reference:– RIC VIII Trier 354 var (S, Spelling errors)

    3.50g. 21.39 mm. 0 degrees

    RI 175al img.JPG
     
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  3. kevin McGonigal

    kevin McGonigal Well-Known Member

    I like its light shading. Too often they are so dark one really can't make out anything on them.
     
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  4. kevin McGonigal

    kevin McGonigal Well-Known Member

     
  5. ancient coin hunter

    ancient coin hunter 3rd Century Usurper

    Nice coin and always interesting type.
     
  6. ancient coin hunter

    ancient coin hunter 3rd Century Usurper

    Nice coin and always interesting type.
     
  7. Gavin Richardson

    Gavin Richardson Well-Known Member

    Who looks down on this type? It’s fascinating.
     
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  8. maridvnvm

    maridvnvm Well-Known Member

    I have heard it said many times over the years. I don't mind or care whather people approve of what I buy and collect as I don't collect them for the approval of others I collect because I enjoy them. I need no other reason than that. Each person should collect for their own reasons and in their own way. I know that I certainly do.
     
  9. 7Calbrey

    7Calbrey Well-Known Member

    Well I post my raw one.

    GallusC O.JPG GallusC FH R.JPG
     
  10. Cachecoins

    Cachecoins Historia Moneta Supporter

  11. wittwolf

    wittwolf Well-Known Member

    Nice coin, I only have a much darker example:
    Constantius Gallus Caesar - FEL TEMP REPARATIO (Fallen Horseman) - Heraclea mint
    Gallus.png
     
  12. dougsmit

    dougsmit Member

    Trier is a hard mint for Gallus. I only have one.
    rx7177bb3163.jpg

    Trier is also difficult for Constantius II. The first below here was from the Bridgnorth hoard.
    rx6336bb3006.jpg

    My only other is barbarous. There are many barbarous coins of this period that bear a Trier mintmark.
    rx6336bb2886.jpg
     
  13. Marsyas Mike

    Marsyas Mike Well-Known Member

    Nice looking Fallen Horsemen. Although I don't know much about them (and have difficulty attributing them sometimes), I really like the type.

    When I saw this thread, I thought I'd see if I had any for Constantine Gallus - I was surprised I had three. Not a very handsome grouping, however:

    Constantius Gallus - Sirmium FEL TEMP lot Aug 2021 (0).jpg
    Constantius Gallus Æ 17
    (351-355 A.D.)
    Sirmium mint

    D N CONSTANTIVS IVN NOB C, bare-headed, draped & cuirass. bust r. / FEL TEMP REPARATIO helmeted soldier standing left, spearing fallen horseman, bearded & bare-headed, reaching back. Mintmark BSIRM•
    RIC VIII Sirmium 53.
    (2.44 grams / 17 mm)
    eBay Aug. 2021

    Constantine Gallus - FEL TEMPS lot Aug 2020 (0).jpg
    Constantius Gallus Æ 21
    (351-355 A.D.)
    Heraclea mint

    DN CON[STAN-TIVS NO]B C bare-headed, draped, cuirassed bust r., Δ behind / [F]EL TEMP RE-PARATIO, soldier spearing fallen diademed horseman reaching back, [SMH(?)].
    RIC VIII Heraclea 87. See note.
    (3.22 grams / 21 mm)
    eBay Aug. 2020
    Attribution Note: Missing details because of chipped flan.
    RIC VIII Heraclea 87 attributes:
    Δ behind head, obverse
    NOB C obverse inscription
    fallen horseman is diademed
    Could find no others on Wildwinds with these attributes.

    Constantine Gallus - Rome FEL T NC lot Aug 2020 (0).jpg
    Constantius Gallus Æ 15
    (352-355 A.D.)
    Rome mint

    DN FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, draped & cuirassed bust right / FEL TE[MP-REP]-ARATIO, soldier spearing fallen horseman, bare-headed, reaching backwards. Mintmark RS.
    RIC VIII Rome 274.
    (2.35 grams / 15 mm)
    eBay Aug. 2020
     
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  14. GinoLR

    GinoLR Well-Known Member

    The only Trier Fel. Temp. Reparatio I have is not a centenionalis with the fallen horseman, and not a Constantius Gallus, but a smaller Constantius II with the Phoenix. Probably something very common, but I don't care. I like it because of the very strange and elongated bust of Constantius II.

    Fel Temp Trèves.jpg AE 17 mm, 2.38 g

    But would I say it? My favourite 'fallen horseman' is a black tiny coin I bought for a mere nothing in a Tunisian souvenir shop when I was very young. I was charmed by its beauty. I just knew it was Roman, nothing more. It must be Constantius II, probably Antioch mint judging by its elegant style:

    fel temp 13mm 2 90 g.jpg AE 13 mm, 2.90 g

    More recently a friend offered me 3 larger centenionales from the Antioch mint. They were very probably found together in some hoard. One is Constantius II, the two others Constantius Gallus:

    Fel Temp.jpg
    AE 22 mm, 5.21 g ; 19-21 mm, 5.33 g ; 22mm, 5.96 g
     
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  15. Cachecoins

    Cachecoins Historia Moneta Supporter

    I think the great thing about this coin type and others like the captives and standards or dragging the captive is how they show such a stark difference in the state of the empire and the messages the emperor wants, or needs, to put out there. With these coins the emperor is saying he is out there defending the empire from the enemy at a time when the empire was in a much less secure situation than it was in the time of its height of power. It's very literal as compared to earlier coins where expressing conceptual ideas through the depiction of a deity was more common.

    This is very straight forward, I am the one standing between you and the enemy who would destroy all that is Rome. I am keeping you safe.

    constantiusII.jpg

    valentin1.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2021
  16. maridvnvm

    maridvnvm Well-Known Member

    A few months on and I have a Constantius II to go with the OP coin

    AE2
    Obv:– D N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right; A behind bust
    Rev:- FEL TEMP RE-P-ARATIO, Helmeted soldier to left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield on ground at right. Horseman is bare headed and reached back towards the emperor
    Minted in a Trier; //TRS
    Reference:– RIC VII Trier 350
    4.79gms. 21.57mm. 180 degrees

    Ex @Harry G

    RI 170gn img.JPG
     
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  17. hotwheelsearl

    hotwheelsearl Well-Known Member

    73BAADEF-311D-4889-8AF5-6DFA03EF4F13.jpeg
    here’s a rather superior example. Not from trier though
     
  18. Roman Collector

    Roman Collector Supporter! Supporter

    My only FH Constantius Gallus is this one from Antioch I bought years ago in an uncleaned lot. It's not exactly FDC, but its reverse design is cool!

    Constantius Gallus fallen horseman Antioch maiorina.jpg
     
  19. Orange Julius

    Orange Julius Well-Known Member

    Great coins @maridvnvm !

    I love FH coins! Glad to see a couple threads about them lately. Trier is the only mint I’m missing for both CII and CG. Trier seems to be much more difficult than even Amiens/Ambianum to find, so great captures!
     
  20. Curtis

    Curtis Supporter! Supporter

    Wow, congratulations! That's no small feat, getting a pair, Constantius II and a Gallus! (Even one would make me very happy.)

    I don't think I have one (certainly none I've photographed, though I have a "Trier 385 [?]" entry in my spreadsheet, haven't been able to find the coin though).

    I had this uncleaned one in my "Maybe-probably-not-Trier" pile years ago, but looking at it again and snapping photos today, I'm ready to call it "Not" (Thessalonica maybe, or just one of many I'll-never-knows, though I guess I could clean it...).

    Constantius II (21mm, 4.59g, 11h):
    Constantius II FTR FH Unknown Mint AE2-AE3.jpg

    Here's one that I've never shown before, also just now photographed. (I love the nice little AE3s too. Not as much as the AE2s, but I still do love them. Even if they don't get shown off as much.)

    Constantius II Sirmium AE3 (18mm, 2.08g, 12h):
    CONSERVATORI-Constantius II AE3 Sirmium Fallen Horseman.png

    I do have other Trier's, including some in my "Barbarians, Captives, and Enemies" Collection (just not FTR FH's as far as I know).

    Constantine I Trier AE3, Captives & Trophy (RIC 279)

    Constantine Captives Trophy AE3 Ex Koci.jpg
     
  21. Harry G

    Harry G Well-Known Member

    I'm glad you like it :D
     
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  22. seth77

    seth77 Well-Known Member

    Trier is almost as difficult for Constantius II as Amiens. This is what I think it's a short flan RIC 350, unfortunately mintmark off flan:

    feltemp.jpg
    It comes from Northamptonshire and was likely one of the first strikes after Constantius II took actual control of Trier in September 353. It also should have been a smaller AE2 at around 20-21mm but instead, the short flan of 17mm shows it as an AE3/4, unfit for the standard of this fourth series. Perhaps the mint needed more time to accommodate the denominations of Constantius II after having minted either small AE3 denominations for Magnentius and Decentius in 352-353, a few different large denominations for Magnentius and Decentius in the first half of 353 and then a few large to medium denominations (AE1-AE2/3) during the "Revolt of Poemenius" episode in August-September 353. The coin is too heavy (4.08g instead of cca. 2.70-2.50g) and the obverse A mark does not fit with a fifth series small module AE3/4 of the period between the end of 353 and 356, but it does show the markings that were carried over from the previous coinages for Magnentius and Decentius.

    The style of the portrait and particularly the nose is also striking Trier.
     
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