Any ideas on how this was done?

Discussion in 'Coin Chat' started by dollar, Nov 16, 2009.

  1. dollar

    dollar Junior Member

    I did post this in the error coins section. I am curious on HOW this is post mint error?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Avatar

    Guest User Guest



    to hide this ad.
  3. nightowl

    nightowl Member

    Stack 3 pennies up and stick 'em in a hydraulic press and that's what you get. Notice that the reverse images are incuse and backwards. On a legitimate error, I don't think it would be backwards....nor incuse. That imprint was made by a positive relief and a die is a negative relief.

    Nightowl
     
  4. raider34

    raider34 Active Member

    Take another Lincoln cent put it on top of that coin and hit it with a hammer, or it could be squeezed in a vice grip.
     
  5. dollar

    dollar Junior Member

    Do me a favor, do what you said and place a picture...
     
  6. raider34

    raider34 Active Member

    Here's a quick one I just did 1 hit with the hammer, got pretty good transfer. [​IMG]
     
  7. BNB Analytics

    BNB Analytics New Member

    Wow interesting.. All from stacking and hammering. Hmm
     
  8. ziggy9

    ziggy9 *NEC SPERNO NEC TIMEO* Supporter

    I did it with nickels. you can see it about 2/3rds of the way down this page

    http://www.cointalk.com/t46932-5/

    There are other nickels posted before it. go to post #72

    Richard
     
  9. raider34

    raider34 Active Member

    Yep, but it wouldn't pass for a heavy die clash, because the the reverse details are incuse, which is a dead giveaway of a hammer job. On an authentic die clash the reverse details would be raised, and usually the details wouldn't transfer over to Lincoln's profile, the details would be seen in the fields, but not on Lincoln's profile.


    Nickle is pretty hard, you must have gave it one hell of a wack :D.
     
  10. dollar

    dollar Junior Member

    What about the lincoln portrait double?
     
  11. dollar

    dollar Junior Member

    Sorry about that... here is the pic of the double lincoln head...
     

    Attached Files:

  12. DoK U Mint

    DoK U Mint In Odd we Trust

    Maul

    I was about to go split some wood for the fireplace.

    Maybe I should give this a wack.

    I was wondering how the mint COULD emit such a thing.:bigeyes:
     
  13. dollar

    dollar Junior Member

    compare yours with mine...
     
  14. dollar

    dollar Junior Member

    DoK U Mint... What do you mean?
     
  15. raider34

    raider34 Active Member

    It's from the pressure, it stretched out the design on the obverse. Your coin was hit at least twice, and the coin was slightly moved between each hit.

    The fact that the memorial building is indented in the obverse is the biggest sign of a hammer job, but there are also others. The loss of detail on the reverse of the coin is another common sign. Also the Memorial building isn't in the right spot if it was a clash, unless it was also a rotated reverse error. Another giveaway is the obverse rim, part of it has been flattened out because of the other coin, and the second hit wasn't as centered so it left an impression of the rim on your coin.
     
  16. Just Carl

    Just Carl Numismatist

    Not to vary long ago some of those started to appear in change as kids made all types of them. As they were posted on the internet, the amount of people doing that with a vise, hammer, press, etc has grown extensively. Eventually there will be some valuable coins also made to look like that by pure accident. Many people that make those have no idea of numismatic values and try imagining a 1914D smashed with another coin. As an example of such possibilities are the ones already shown here. Sorry to sound like a prude with such negative statements but I really like coins and always wondered where so many go.
     
  17. dollar

    dollar Junior Member

    Okay, could you do this? Another giveaway is the obverse rim, part of it has been flattened out because of the other coin, and the second hit wasn't as centered so it left an impression of the rim on your coin PLEASE. explain this...
     
  18. dollar

    dollar Junior Member

    Just show me how this was done...

    Not to vary long ago some of those started to appear in change as kids made all types of them. As they were posted on the internet, the amount of people doing that with a vise, hammer, press, etc has grown extensively. Eventually there will be some valuable coins also made to look like that by pure accident. Many people that make those have no idea of numismatic values and try imagining a 1914D smashed with another coin. As an example of such possibilities are the ones already shown he
     
  19. DoK U Mint

    DoK U Mint In Odd we Trust

    I'm back.

    I was wondering how the MINT could punch out such a product.

    Now I'm off to the shed and I'm going to break the law by whacking my two cents worth because I find this an informative thread.

    Before & after photos to follow.
     
  20. raider34

    raider34 Active Member

    [​IMG]

    The Red shows where the rim was flattened out, that was from the coin on top of it, and the pressure from either a hammer or vice. Both Black and Blue show a circular line indentation, that is from the rim of another coin.

    Sorry, but there is no way this was done by the mint.
     
  21. dollar

    dollar Junior Member

    Listen, all I am saying is that this coin CANNO'T be done the way you said it could be done...please post a full obverse photo of what you did with a hammer and compare it to the one I submitted...
     
Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page