1988 LINCOLN CENT, GUESS THE GRADE.

Discussion in 'What's it Worth' started by coins776, Feb 15, 2016.

  1. coins776

    coins776 no title

  2. Avatar

    Guest User Guest



    to hide this ad.
  3. tpsadler

    tpsadler Numismatist

    From what I can see MS66 it appears to have rubs on the obverse on lower part of lincoln
     
  4. Paddy54

    Paddy54 Hey brother can you spare a half dime?

  5. swamp yankee

    swamp yankee Well-Known Member

  6. ikes4ever

    ikes4ever Senior Member

  7. rlm's cents

    rlm's cents Numismatist

    MS67 and if those tiny things I see are on the slab, 68
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2016
  8. coins776

    coins776 no title

  9. coins776

    coins776 no title

  10. coins776

    coins776 no title

    i bought it in the pcgs ms67 slab and then
    i broke it out of the slab and sent it to ngc.
     
    Stevearino and phankins11 like this.
  11. tpsadler

    tpsadler Numismatist

    I am not an expert on modern Lincolns but if you look on sold Heritage NGC 1988 RD MS 68 had sold for quite a bit less than a comparable PCGS 1988 RD MS 68 Lincolns. Just an observation .. go not shoot the messenger :)
     
  12. coins776

    coins776 no title

    true. but pcgs would most likely give it an ms67
    if submitted to them again which would be worth
    far less than an ngc ms68.
     
  13. tpsadler

    tpsadler Numismatist

    but for some reason a MS68 RD Lincoln in a NGC holder only sells on Heritage for ~$150 where a MS68 RD Lincoln in a PCGS Holders sells for ~2000 ... looks to me ppl buying these coins have more faith in PCGS ... Maybe have this coin in a NGC with a CAC Sticker
     
  14. rlm's cents

    rlm's cents Numismatist

    Typically, PCGS Lincolns sell for more than NGC and top pops can do MUCH more. For instance, a MS67 1954- PCGS went for $25,000, but NGC can go for $3,000. (Although pcgs prices have dropped a lot this year.) Secondly, the last PCGS sales at Heritage were $800 and $500 both last year. Meanwhile, a PCGS MS67 sells for <$50.
     
  15. tpsadler

    tpsadler Numismatist

    My point was poorly stated on my end. Just because a coin is graded whatever, does not or should imply that to be the major cost factor. Whether by NGC or PCGS or any TPG the character of the coin determines the price a collector will pay for the item regardless of who graded it. Point in case from what I had seen on PCGS Site for Heritage Sale Prices PCGS sold for substantially more for a MS68 Lincoln compared to a NGC MS 68 Lincoln. @coins776 had posted a Lincoln asking to guess a grade then showed this coin in a graded slab from PCGS at MS67 then the same coin graded by a NGS @ MS 68.. my point maybe from these peoples views and the convoluted (Market Grading) method for grading coins it was thought is was worth around $90 and that then determined the grade they would post. Sorry this will trigger many ideas for why Market vs Technical Grading occurs and how it is impossible to presume anything other than ownership of an item and the approximate worth to you and others. For this very reason I see Technical Grading is superior and including an Attribute Number (Unknown at this time) so we as dealers and collectors get a handle on such a controversial issue. :) I am now climbing off my chair :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2016
  16. rlm's cents

    rlm's cents Numismatist

    Most people today not only use the grade as a major factor, but as the only factor.

    As an aside, if it is not a major factor for pricing, just what good is it?
     
  17. physics-fan3.14

    physics-fan3.14 You got any more of them.... prooflikes?

    It has nothing to do with having more faith in the PCGS grade. It has everything to do with the PCGS registry, which only accepts PCGS coins. PCGS high grade moderns often go for ridiculous sums because of this.
     
Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page