1959 or 1957? What’s up with this penny?

Discussion in 'Error Coins' started by Jenalee, Aug 30, 2020.

  1. Jenalee

    Jenalee New Member

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  3. paddyman98

    paddyman98 I'm a professional expert in specializing! Supporter

    Simple answer..
    If it has a Wheat Back it is a 1957.. If it has a Memorial Building on the Back it will be a 1959.
    The Reverse design changed in 1959.

    It looks like a 1959 that took a nice hit.
    Post Mint Damage.
     
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  4. Danomite

    Danomite What do you say uh-huh

    It’s a 1959-d that took a hit on the last 9.
     
  5. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    Looks more like a damaged 9 than a 7 but follow what Paddyman said. The reverse is the key.
     
  6. John Conduitt

    John Conduitt Well-Known Member

    I know nothing about post mint damage, but how would a coin take a hit that turned a nine like the first one into the nine we see here at the end, without any sign of trauma to the rest of the coin? The back of the 9 has been straightened and moved over - which surely isn't possible with brute force. Perhaps in Photoshop, but not in reality.
     
  7. Michael K

    Michael K Well-Known Member

    Copper is a relatively soft metal. The numbers and letters are raised, and easily moved when struck with a small amount of force.
    Something can strike just that area of the coin, affect the 9 and nothing else.
     
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  8. paddyman98

    paddyman98 I'm a professional expert in specializing! Supporter

    Yes in reality.. That's what occurred. I've seen many examples over the years. Not a Photoshop picture.
    Any damage wil wear down over the years.
     
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  9. paddyman98

    paddyman98 I'm a professional expert in specializing! Supporter

  10. John Conduitt

    John Conduitt Well-Known Member

    Ok fair enough. Vending and coin wrapping machines seem to take aim for the last digit in the date!
     
  11. alurid

    alurid Well-Known Member

    Ever see someone crack open a roll of coins on the edge of the cashiers draw?
     
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  12. Inspector43

    Inspector43 Collecting Since 1948 Supporter

  13. Collecting Nut

    Collecting Nut Borderline Hoarder

    Copper is soft and easily bent or moved, especially on a copper cent. An egg shell is hard until it is struck with something a little harder. Then is crumbles.
     
  14. Jenalee

    Jenalee New Member

    Thank you for all your input. It is the memorial building. I thought there were some errors out there however, of 1957 pennies with this reverse?
     
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  15. Jenalee

    Jenalee New Member

  16. Jenalee

    Jenalee New Member

    Thanks for your feedback. I hope you don’t think mine is photoshopped?
     
  17. Danomite

    Danomite What do you say uh-huh

    No, there are no known examples of a Memorial reverse on a 1957 cent. There is a controversial 1959-D with a wheat reverse.
    http://www.lincolncentresource.com/Controversial/Cents.html
     
  18. Jenalee

    Jenalee New Member

    Thank you for your feedback. Why would the top of the nine be straight on the top and the curved part look completely different from the other? I also thought that some of the 1957’s were accidentally minted with the Memorial building reverse.
    Oh okay! ☹️ Thanks
     
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  19. Jenalee

    Jenalee New Member

     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2020
  20. Danomite

    Danomite What do you say uh-huh

    Jenalee likes this.
  21. Jenalee

    Jenalee New Member

    Thank you! Question? There has to be errors out there that are unknown and found. Is there a way to get your error verified? I live in a small town. I mean a new error can be found right? Just curious for the future. Even if it’s not on the list.
     
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