Warning ...do not purchase a 1776 Continental Currency coin until further notice

Discussion in 'Coin Chat' started by irisheyes, Mar 22, 2012.

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  1. irisheyes

    irisheyes New Member

    The "EXPERTS" on cointalk can say what they want ...which if you read..... WHAT THEY SAID TO ME.. you'll see HOW uncalled for and rude they are.

    If you are thinking about purchasing one of the RARE CONTINENTAL CURRENCY COINS of 1776

    I strongly advise you to do some research.

    These coins are said to have been the first dollar of the United States....however other than one brief article ( unverified) referring to a COPPER coin in a local 1776 newspaper there is no mention of them being used anywhere by anyone.


    THAT ALONE IS A GOOD REASON FOR DOUBT ...... !!

    Add the fact that the first US mint wasn't even built in 1776 and wasnt actually in operation for at least another 20 years

    There are so many other reasons ......WHY TAKE THE RISK ???

    READ THE HISTORY BOOKS and YOU WILL SEE FOR YOURSELF .....!!

    IF YOU OWN ONE OF THESE COINS ...DONT BE FOOLED ...and DONT SELL IT FOR ANY REASON.

    UNLESS IT IS A STRUCK PEWTER COIN AND SOMEONE IS WILLING TO PAY YOU $100,000 FOR IT
    2687561411_2aac8bd00a.jpg

    SOMEHOW I DOUBT THAT IS GOING TO HAPPEN AGAIN ANYTIME SOON.

    LOL !!.
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  3. Leadfoot

    Leadfoot there is no spoon

    For every real one of these you see 100 fakes. Your advice is well founded.
  4. medoraman

    medoraman Well-Known Member Supporter

    I would say 10,000-1. These were one of the first great rarities in American numismatics, and as such were so well known that copies have been made of them for over a century. I agree with the OP that I would never advocate buying such a coin unless it was from a well known dealer with a lifetime return policy for fakes, or slabbed by a major TPG.

    See Irisheyes, you say something reasonable and we agree. :) Btw the fact that there was not a Federal mint doesn't mean much, since there was lots of private striking and State coining going on. Colonial coinage is quite fascinating in its own right. I recommend David Bowers book in the subject. These coins were privately minted as prototypes of a possible currency, they were never struck for commercial use. That is why they are found in metals other than silver, (though not plated).
  5. james m. wolfe

    james m. wolfe New Member

  6. Hunt1

    Hunt1 Active Member

    ipbanpls.
  7. jloring

    jloring Senior Citizen

    I agree with that, lol.
  8. Conder101

    Conder101 Numismatist

    Correct. And one other thing that has not been mentioned in all of these discussions. The issues of Continental paper currency through 1775 always contained a one dollar issue. The 1776 paper authorization did not, but these prototype coins appeared. The one dollar paper denomination returned with the 1777 authorization. (There were actually several different authorizations and I don't have the exact dates at this time, I'm looking, but the skipping of the dollar denomination of at least one issue in 1776 is true.) It is believed they intended to replace the paper note with a dollar coin, but they could not secure sufficient bullion supplies. (How about that, over two hundred years a we tried to replace the dollar bill with a coin and we couldn't do it then either. :) )

    Got the dates. The issues through the May 9th 1776 did include the dollar denomination. The Jult 22nd 1776 issue did not include it. It did skip more than one issue (I thought it was just one) and returned with the Jan 14th 1779 issue.
  9. LostDutchman

    LostDutchman Moderator Moderator

    If you are going to buy one. Buy it certified by PCGS or NGC... it's pretty simple.
  10. irisheyes

    irisheyes New Member

    YES YOU ARE RIGHT THERE WERE OTHER COINS BEING USED IN AND AROUND 1776
    AND THEY ARE MENTIONED


    AND THEY DON'T LOOK ANYTHING LIKE THE SO CALL FIRST US DOLLAR STRUCK IN PEWTER ...




    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
  11. irisheyes

    irisheyes New Member

    [h=2]Continental Currency coin [​IMG][​IMG][/h]
  12. Hunt1

    Hunt1 Active Member

    Why are we shouting, you know that is rude but yet you contradict yourself and call us rude. Please turn your caps key off.

    Thank you.
  13. irisheyes

    irisheyes New Member

  14. ow9654

    ow9654 Irish,British collector

    Apples and oranges?
    What has that got to do with this thread or this forum?
  15. fishwhacker

    fishwhacker Member

    The big question is how much did you pay for your obviously fake coin to suddenly caution people from buying anything? 500$? 1000$? More? Good luck with that.
  16. ikandiggit

    ikandiggit Currency Error Collector

    Irisheyes.... you lost. Don't bother trying to start another battle, all the correct information has been given to you. You know that what you have is a toy coin made in Hong Kong in the 1960's and you were taken for a ride by whomever sold you that coin. Accept that fact and move on.
  17. fishwhacker

    fishwhacker Member

  18. rlm's cents

    rlm's cents Numismatist

    FWIW, there is a single uncertified USA coin dated 1776 listed on eBay at the moment as a USA listing. There are a few foreign listings of USA coins. I am not sure just how eBay is taking care of foreign listings of replica/counterfeit coins is or well be handled. They seem to be having problems in this area.
  19. leaconcen

    leaconcen learning constantly

    Things were so nice and calm yesterday. Please can't we move on.
  20. Conder101

    Conder101 Numismatist

    True, but it was not unknown for pattern/proposal pieces struck in Europe. And that Massachusetts pine tree piece looks like higher quality workmanship than your piece. And yours doesn't come close to the workmanship of the known genuine coins.
  21. cpm9ball

    cpm9ball Cannot Re-Member

    Irish,

    I stayed out of all of these debates because I realized that it was going to be a "Lose/Lose" situation all the way around. My suggestion to you would be to send the coin to the ANA, NGC, PCGS or somebody to have it authenticated. And, just by chance you are wrong, it would be nice if you would post those findings here. Of course, if you are right, I'm sure you won't hesitate to gloat over all the naysayers. However, if you don't want to send the coin to have it authenticated, then the only thing that posts like this prove is that you know how to use a computer and type.

    Chris
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