Shipwreck/pirate coins

Discussion in 'World & Ancient Coins' started by jtwetzel, Nov 11, 2013.

  1. jtwetzel

    jtwetzel Member

    Anyone have any coins in their collection that has been from a shipwreck? These interest me and I was wondering if anyone had some pictures to post of some of these. I do not own any but would like to some day. It would be even better to go on a dive and actually find some!!
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  3. Sean the Coin Collector

    Sean the Coin Collector Active Member

    Hello as a matter a fact i do i dont have images but it looks like this !!

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  4. jtwetzel

    jtwetzel Member

    Very nice! Did you buy it online or from a dealer or show?
  5. Sean the Coin Collector

    Sean the Coin Collector Active Member

    Got it on ebay for 62 dollars a few months back !!
  6. jtwetzel

    jtwetzel Member

    Awesome! I really want to add some shipwrecked coins to my collection some day. I am fascinated with treasure and lost valuables from wrecks and pirates and all of that type of stuff haha.
  7. Sean the Coin Collector

    Sean the Coin Collector Active Member

    Its pretty cool stuff you should be able to pick up a coin from the Admiral Gardnier wreck it had east india trading companies coins on it and it will only cost you about 15 dollars for one !
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  8. silentnviolent

    silentnviolent accumulator

    The El Cazador ones are plentiful; the smaller the denomination, the more scarce as a general rule. Here are my two.
    017.JPG 018.JPG
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  9. silentnviolent

    silentnviolent accumulator

    Here are 3 more I'm not so sure about, other than that I believe they are Spanish milled copper cobs. The first one I think is dated 1616. The second one I can only make out what I think is a castle within a wreath on the one side; cannot tell the other side. The third one looks like another castle within wreath, counterstamped IMB within (I think). The other side appears to be a cat. I know little else about them. Here is a site that sells some of these: http://www.ancientresource.com/lots/shipwreck-pirate-coins.html
    image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg

    Sorry the photos are sideways... I misplaced the battery charger for my normal camera and was forced to use the Ipad for the pics.
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2013
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  10. jtwetzel

    jtwetzel Member

    Where did you acquire these cobs from? They are really cool looking!
  11. silentnviolent

    silentnviolent accumulator

    I got all 3 as one lot in a local auction.
  12. silentnviolent

    silentnviolent accumulator

    But some very similar cobs are for sale in the link I posted. In fact, that is the link I learned the most about them from. About 1/3 of the way down there is a 'random coin' option for $25/coin.
  13. jtwetzel

    jtwetzel Member

    Oh very nice!
  14. silentnviolent

    silentnviolent accumulator

  15. randygeki

    randygeki Coin Collector

    Heres mine :)
    0_026.JPG
    Spanish Cob 1 real, recovered from the Santa Maria de La Consolacion

    "She was heavily loaded with silver coins intended for Panama. Soon after leaving port she was pursued by two pirate ships commanded by the famous pirate Bartholomew Sharpe. To save the treasure from the pirates, the Spanish captain ran the ship aground on the rocks of Isle de Muerto (Island of Death), Ecuador in July of 1681. The Spanish then burned the ship, depriving the pirates of the valuable treasure. Enraged, the pirates landed and slaughtered 140 Spanish survivors."

    "The Spanish treasure ship Santa Maria de la Consolocion left Callao, Chile in 1681, bound for Panama, where her precious cargo that was to be transported across the isthmus and then shipped onto Spain. Because of a delay in getting its silver coins from the mint in Potosi, Bolivia, she was forced to sail alone, after the rest of the South Sea Armada had departed. The lone galleon was soon attacked by a fleet of six British pirate ships. The captain attempted to defend his precious cargo by landing his ship on a small island named Isla de Muerto (Island of the Dead) in the Bay of Guayaquil, Ecuador. The vessel accidentally hit a reef and began to sink. To prevent the treasure from falling into the hands of the pirates, the captain set the ship afire. The pirates, furious that the ship had been burned, captured and beheaded the estimated 350 passengers and crew of the ship. Neither the pirates, nor the returning Spaniards were able to recover the treasure from the shark infested waters. "
  16. jtwetzel

    jtwetzel Member

    Awesome history there! That is the kind of stuff I want in my collection!!
  17. Siberian Man

    Siberian Man Senior Member Moderator

    This coin was lifted from the British ship "Admiral Gardener".

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  18. Collect89

    Collect89 Coin Collector

    Have you seen any of Daniel Sedwick's auctions? Here is a link to Daniel Sedwick auction archives:
    http://www.sedwickcoins.com/archive.htm
    You might enjoy viewing their traeasure auction catalog #12. At the beginning of #12 each shipwreck is described & the coins are nicely depicted throughout the catalog. All the catalogs are great but you might want to start with #12.

    Let me know if you find this information useful.
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2013
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  19. jtwetzel

    jtwetzel Member

    Wow..very informative! I really wish I had a bigger budget to buy some shipwreck coins..I'll be sure to save up!!
  20. medoraman

    medoraman Well-Known Member Supporter

    "Shipwreck" coins always bring a premium due to people dreaming of Johnny Depp as a pirate, etc. Its probably one of the most overused marketing phrases in coins. If you truly wish to buy one of these, make sure its properly documented, since without the documentation all you are buying is a sea damaged coin for way too much money.
  21. jtwetzel

    jtwetzel Member

    Good point. The coin would be worth a lot less since it would be damaged by salt water and the currents. But if it is documented it will have some great historical value to it (which to some people is quite priceless). Besides, without history and mankind, coins would be worthless.

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