My first attempt at scanning some notes

Discussion in 'Paper Money' started by jmf2737, Apr 1, 2011.

  1. jmf2737

    jmf2737 New Member

    I posted a couple of these notes already, but I just bought a new scanner and wanted to see how they came out here. Nothing really valuable I'm guessing.

    On a side note, this scanner I bought, Canon LiDe 110, won't scan the new 20's and 10's. I keep getting an error message. Thought it was something I did, so I uninstalled the scanner and reinstalled. Still won't scan the newer bills. Oh well.

    Attached Files:

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  3. jmf2737

    jmf2737 New Member

    Last pic:

    Attached Files:

  4. jmf2737

    jmf2737 New Member

    Please be brutally honest as far as the quality of pictures. I really never uploaded a lot of pictures before, I used Picasa with my new scanner. Hope to upload more finds!:smile
  5. BRandM

    BRandM Counterstamp Collector

    Your scans look good jmf, but seem to be a little bit fuzzy. I have a LiDe 210 and get really great results with it, especially on currency. I'm not familiar with the 110, so don't know its capabilities. I think your scans are fine though, unless you're looking for auction quality images.

    Bruce
  6. jloring

    jloring Senior Citizen

    Anti-counterfeiting software in new scanners prevents you from scanning newer notes.
  7. Dr Kegg

    Dr Kegg Star Note Fanatic

    I'm thinking a little fuzzy as well. I'm surprised at all of the problems with scanners on the forum. I use an HP all in one and have never had a problem.
  8. scottishmoney

    scottishmoney Nothing hotter than well armed women.

    With scanning notes, the new notes have to be scanned on an old scanner. I have an old HP and a Canon in strategic reserve for scanning. I have been playing around with scanning banknotes for about 13-14 years now, there are all sorts of little tweaks you can do - adjusting resolution is the absolute biggest and most important one.

    [​IMG]
    I typically scan older notes with 300dpi, but some newer notes with microprinting etc I scan at 600dpi. The next step is lighting/brightness, then background colours - some notes need to be scanned with the lid of the scanner open - giving a back background. For some older and worn notes I prefer to use a grey coloured sheet of paper taped to the cover of the scanner - then I can blend it in with my background image.

    This one is an older note with some wear on the edges - I scanned this with the lid open, and then worked with it in my ancient software that I had to convert to 64bit to use and did cut outs with the background to produce the effect here:

    [​IMG]

    Which is best when imaging items with uneven edges - early Nationals were often cut with slicers or even scissors so edges are often not straight so you have to accomodate that in your image.
  9. jmf2737

    jmf2737 New Member

    Thanks for the advice. I read somewhere here that it was best to scan notes using the highest resolution, 600dpi. Would scanning with a less dpi makes them "less fuzzy?". Are there any tools in Picasa to sharpen the images and make them "less fuzzy?"
  10. scottishmoney

    scottishmoney Nothing hotter than well armed women.

    Less fuzzy - more resolution - but then you might have to adjust the image size also. When I scan at 300dpi I get an image that is approximately 4X the actual size - then I can "lift" out vignettes etc that I want closeups of. I resize the whole note size to about 800 pixels wide to adjust for screen sizes on PC's. 800 Pixels seems to be the standard maximum width that most browsers process easily and don't do an auto-resize like here on CoinTalk.

    My best advice is to play around with your scanner and change settings and see the results - it has to be a trial and error or satisfaction thing.
  11. scottishmoney

    scottishmoney Nothing hotter than well armed women.

    An example of a high resolution, large sized image that I cut out of the banknote scan for an enhanced image of the vignette subject:

    [​IMG]
  12. Dr Kegg

    Dr Kegg Star Note Fanatic

    I'm sorry I don't have anything to add to this since my scanner works rather well. It is approximately 6 years old though, so that might be why. SM, I had no idea you had so many problems with scanning notes!
  13. gbroke

    gbroke Naturally Toned Supporter

    I thought the title read "My first attempt at scamming some.."

    Turns out I am just a lazy reader. phew.
  14. gsalexan

    gsalexan Bank note aficionado

    I've always been envious of the quality of your scans. Now I see how much experimentation you've done. My biggest problem has been moiré patterns (pronounced moray, for those unfamiliar). These are the geometric patterns you get when the fine lines of an engraving are picked up by a scanner that scans in fine straight lines, but slightly askew. You get interference patterns like the one below. Sometimes very interesting but not usually welcome.

    I usually scan at 200 dpi, but it sounds like you use 300 dpi and then resize -- correct? I think I've still had this problem occasionally even at that resolution.

    Attached Files:

  15. Ripley

    Ripley Senior Member

    Not bad JMF. It came out good.
  16. scottishmoney

    scottishmoney Nothing hotter than well armed women.

    There are a few Giesecke & Devrient printed notes from the German States in the late 19th century that are real stinkers for moire patterns - the others are usually Joh Enschede en Zonen printed Dutch notes from the mid 1930's into the '40's. With those I have to crank up the volume/resolution and tweak the image size. It took some experimentation and more than a few frustrating results to finally be able to image them but only marginally and still not quite what I would want:

    [​IMG]

    This reverse was one of the biggest stinkers I have ever had to work with - the fine multicoloured pattern on the reverse - a pretty high tech accomplishment for a 70+ year old printing and one that messes with modern scanners. But back to the 100+ year old German notes:

    [​IMG]

    And then look at the finely balanced lithographic printed background:

    [​IMG]

    The lithographed printing must have been accomplished with multiple colour passes and then the intaglio printing with the borders, text and vignettes was done last. Notice that this aged note clearly has microprinted text in the background. Of course this note was another bit of a stinker, not as much as the Dutch notes but still a bit of work.
  17. SteveInTampa

    SteveInTampa Innocent bystander

    I agree Matt. I also have an HP, and it scans any and everything.
  18. gsalexan

    gsalexan Bank note aficionado

    DANG! Those are phenomenal! The scans as well as the notes themselves. Great job! You've set a pretty high benchmark for the rest of us. :) I suppose moire patterns are exactly what the printers intended for photo-counterfeiters, so it's not like they should be unexpected.
  19. scottishmoney

    scottishmoney Nothing hotter than well armed women.

    Which is why you have to sometimes crank up the resolution and size:

    [​IMG]

    But then look at the moiring in the central vignette on this smaller image:

    [​IMG]
  20. gsalexan

    gsalexan Bank note aficionado

    I have that same vignette of the woman on a Commemorative Panel. Okay: this will be a good experiment. I'll see what it takes to scan without a moire and post the results.
  21. NorthKorea

    NorthKorea Baseball Bat Collector

    $20 bill scan test.jpg

    Woo hoo! At least one of my scanners is old enough to copy US currency. :p (I wrote "COPY" on the bottom so that I don't end up accidentally contributing to counterfeiting.)

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