50, 25 & 5 PTAS Silver Coins Spain??

Discussion in 'World & Ancient Coins' started by ryanbrooks, Mar 27, 2008.

  1. ryanbrooks

    ryanbrooks US Coin Collector

  2. Avatar

    Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide this ad.
  3. Victor

    Victor Coin Collector

    On these coins you need to look at the back side (reverse) for the minting date. The star has two numbers inside it. That is the date the coin was made. For example I have a nice 1957 twenty five peseta. But inside the star it says 70. So it was made in 1970. And no they are not silver. Hope this helps.
  4. hontonai

    hontonai Registered Contrarian

    Zero percent.

    They are all cu-ni.

    Krause values them from 10¢ (5 peseta F) to $1,000 (50 peseta proof), depending on year and condition.

    They were minted with the 1957 date from 1957-75 with Franco's bust, and upon restoration of the monarchy in 1975, they were minted with a bust of King Juan Carlos I for a number of additional years.

    To determine the actual date of your coins look in the tiny six-pointed stars on the reverse. Your pictures are much too dark to read the dates.
  5. ryanbrooks

    ryanbrooks US Coin Collector

    The 50 PTAS is 1958 - AU 55
    The 25 PTAS is 1960 - MS 67
    The 5 PTAS is 1961 - MS 60

    So, any value or no?
    Thank you all
  6. hontonai

    hontonai Registered Contrarian

    50 PTAS 1958 - AU 55 - 75¢ XF, $2.50 Unc.
    25 PTAS 1960 - MS 67 - Look again. None listed for 1960.
    5 PTAS 1961 - MS 60 - Unc. $25
  7. ryanbrooks

    ryanbrooks US Coin Collector

    25 PTAS - 1966 (my mistake) and very high condition.
  8. hontonai

    hontonai Registered Contrarian

    25 PTAS - 1966 very high condition - XF $1, Unc. $5, BU $10
  9. ryanbrooks

    ryanbrooks US Coin Collector

    Alright then, thank you. So the 1961 5 PTAS is worth $25 in MS60 condition? And where do you get this information from?
    Thanks, you have been a big help.
  10. hontonai

    hontonai Registered Contrarian

    I most definitely did not say the coins were "worth" the amounts listed. I just reported the values given in the 2008 35th Ed. 20th Century Standard Catalog of World Coins.

    Catalog prices are a very, very rough guide and are seldom accurate. Recently ended auctions and dealer prices are much more accurate, but sometimes hard to come by, especially for relatively low value coins.
  11. Thender

    Thender Senior Member

    I've got a boat load of these coins from my time over in Europe. I did not realize the date was in the star... Why the main date on the obverse?
  12. chrisild

    chrisild Coin Collector Moderator

    That is the authorization date. But they stopped doing that more than 25 years ago, and have used the "actual year" plus the mintmark (crowned M) instead since then.

    Christian
  13. Thender

    Thender Senior Member

    Interesting... I just recently placed one of each of what I thought to be different coins into 2X2 flips... And I have a bunch left over... Now I get to go through them again... Thank you for the information! :thumb:
  14. Thender

    Thender Senior Member

    Thanks again! I just added 4 25's and 10 5's to my Spanish coin collection... And now my eyes hurt from looking through the loops... :p
  15. Thender

    Thender Senior Member

    And now I have (in 5 Ptas coins) a '59 and '71 through '84... Still have a couple of bags of European coins to search through, some where in my basement, just need to get them dug out now...
  16. cladking

    cladking Coin Collector

    Good news and bad news.

    The '61 now lists for $30 in unc and Krause tends to undervalue most modern base metal coins quite a bit in unc and chU. The market appears pretty strong on these right now in Spain.

    The bad news is that to be considered unc the coin can't have a rub and has to look reasonably good. XF's are only $3.50 and any deficiency will downgrade the coin.
  17. Martial

    Martial New Member

    I have 25 PTAS 1957 were is the star.
    I also have 5PTAS 1957 and 50 PTAS 1974 And 1 PTAS 1968 what can i get for them
  18. Martial

    Martial New Member

    I have 25 PTAS 1957 but were is the star. also have 5 PTAS 1957 and 50 ptas 1968 are they any good
  19. andyscouse

    andyscouse Collector of Brit stuff

    They stopped the 'authorisation' year in 1982.

    They had, as I recall, 1957, 1966, 1975 and 1980 before that, with dates in stars. 1975 was when King Juan Carlos I ascended to the re-instated throne, theose prior were for that naughty Mr Franco, who dictated from 1936 until 1975. Interestingly, though (and I don't know why), he groomed the young Juan Carlos to become King after his death. Maybe a European could answer this?
  20. chrisild

    chrisild Coin Collector Moderator

    Franco was a monarchist in the sense of being against the republic, but after the civil war he continued to be head of state - as a "regent" of the Kingdom of Spain. (Hence the "Caudillo de España por la Gracia de Dios" title which can also be found on the coins.) His idea was that, after his death, a king would become head of state. However, it seems that Franco considered the "rightful heir to the throne" - Juan de Borbón, Count of Barcelona - to be too liberal to continue the authoritarian regime. That is why (in 1970 or so) he decided that Juan Carlos would be king and his successor.

    Unfortunately from a Franquist point of view, Juan Carlos turned out be a supporter of democracy. What certainly made him quite popular was his position during the (failed) military coup in 1981. Obviously the post-Franco head of state had different ideas. ;)

    Christian
  21. andyscouse

    andyscouse Collector of Brit stuff

    Chris

    Ah! I see ... very interesting! Thanks for that info. I know for sure I didn't know that Franco was a monarchist! Probably a bit like our very own Oliver Cromwell, who in the end ended up putting his own portrait on the latter Civil War coinage rather than the conjoined shields ...

Share This Page